2019-09-06 02:22:13

Has anybody found any online resources that are good at explaining how to do this? I'm slowly getting back into the acoustic guitar scene and desperately need new strings. I haven't the slightest clue as to how to string one, so any help would be great.

2019-09-06 03:19:41

I've done it, but I don't play guitar, I've just done it with my brother's, but I can't really explain the process. It's not difficult though.

I'm the captain of this ship,
don't worry about the little clicks,
Everything is working fine,
nevermind that audible whine.

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2019-09-06 17:52:20

I often had to do it. all i can suggest you to do is remove the string from the guitar, and see how they did it. the top part where you turn the string to tune it, is quite easy: you just have to put 1 end of the string in the hole, hold it while you give it say 5 turns just to make sure it is tight enought for it to maintain some tension.
Then you tie it in the other side end of the guitar's hole. the hole where the strings are grouped. not the round hole in the middle:d
then turn and turn and turn untill it is tuned to the correct notes.
I hope you could understand me. let me know, and i will try to explain better.

best regards
never give up on what ever you are doing.

2019-09-06 19:19:14

I would do it the other way first, put the other end of the string in the hole right past the bridge, then thread the other end through the correct peg on the neck and start turning. If you have one of those thingies that goes around the knob and lets you wind it rapidly, use it.

I'm the captain of this ship,
don't worry about the little clicks,
Everything is working fine,
nevermind that audible whine.

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2019-09-06 20:57:18

Can you provide any info on what the bridge of your guitar looks like? (The place where the strings meet the body.) The process varies depending on the design, so knowing that would help. It'll probably be one of three designs:  For steel-string acoustics, it'll either be a bridge with holes that the strings slide through, or have small pegs that can be pulled out, under which the strings are threaded and then reinserted. If it's a classical guitar, the strings will feel like they're tied together in pairs at the bridge.

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2019-09-07 02:20:59

I could never tie the strings properly, my fingers are too big. If you have a guitar store near you, you should go there, they can get it done in a day or so, depending on the kind of business they're getting.

Guitarman.
What has been created in the laws of nature holds true in the laws of magic as well. Where there is light, there is darkness,  and where there is life, there is also death.
Aerodyne: first of the wizard order

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2019-09-07 03:54:35

They will string a guitar for you? What is the point in that, if you play, you should be able to restring yourself. You can't say, be playing a gig and snap a string and be like hang on while I get the guitar shop to fix this up.

I'm the captain of this ship,
don't worry about the little clicks,
Everything is working fine,
nevermind that audible whine.

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2019-09-07 04:02:55

Getting started again though, if you need help to get off the ground, I see no problem with this.
Besides, if you're gigging and you're not just solo, it's possible someone else in your band is able/willing to help you restring a guitar if you bust something or just want a replacement.

Check out my Manamon text walkthrough at the following link:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/z8ls3rc3f4mkb … n.txt?dl=1

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2019-09-07 04:33:29

@Ironcross, you've never heard of having a backup guitar? At some gigs, you have a limited time to play, the clubs  don't hold up while your repairing. All gigs aren't that way, but you need to be prepared for something like that. Sometimes it's also necessary to bring an extra amp, but while playing a gig it's more likely you'll bust a string or two. If he's only practicing, he could just take it to get strung, until he can do it himself.

Guitarman.
What has been created in the laws of nature holds true in the laws of magic as well. Where there is light, there is darkness,  and where there is life, there is also death.
Aerodyne: first of the wizard order

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2019-09-07 06:23:58

Get used to getting it strung for you and you will never learn. I'm also in that camp. Why wait for them to take a day to string it when I could learn to do it painsteakingly until now when I can do it in about five minutes? And as for gigging, yes, you could bring multiple guitars. But not if you are tavelling on your own at least, not easily. smile I will bring two guitars if I am getting a ride to a gig.

The bridge with the hole the strings go through and the classical guitar's bridge are actualy the same design. The only difference being that steel strings have a proper end that keeps them from sliding past. With classicals, you have to tie it around the bridge by using the same hole.

For restringing, after i remove all the strings I make sure to use the tuning pegs to turn the heads so that the hole the string has to be threaded through is parallel to the neck. Here are basic instructions for the standard steel string bridge.

1. With a pair of pliers or dedicated pin pullers, remove one of the six bridge pins and put the balled end of the string in the hole. Then reinsert the pin
2. For your g, b, and E strings, in order to make sure they stay straight as possible, find the appropriate groove in the nut, the part where the headstock joins the rest of the neck, and stretch the string out until it is resting against the side of the correct tuning head that is closest to you, assuming the headstock is facing toward your left. This is a little hard to explain, but use your sense of touch. If you try and rest the string against the opposite side of the tuning head, the string will go off on an angle and you don't want that. Conversely, the E, A and D strings go on the side of the appropriate  head that is further from you. Again, sense of touch.
3. Remember how I said I turned the heads so that the wholes are always parallel with the neck? Here's why. Wind the string around the tuning head once, then thread the end through the whole and pull until  the string stays relatively wound around the peg.
4. Turn the tuning peg until the string begins to tighten, but not until the correct pitch, just tight enough so that it won't slip. The repeat the process for the other 5 strings.
5. Tune all six strings one at a time, baring in mind that if you have done it correctly, the e, A and D strings should be tuned by turning the pegs in one direction, and the opposite for the three thinner strings.


That may have been a little complicated to explain, so if anything is unclear, please post. Also, google articles on restringing acoustics... there are plenty of them that go into great detail.

regards,
assault_freak

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2019-09-07 06:50:05

@Assault, thank you that was very informative. My electric needs to be strung, I will try to string the guitar myself. I just don't want to buy a pack and somehow mess It up and then put out more money. I've seen people string guitars, it looks strait forward, I'll give it a shot. The store I use for maitinence is a little too far away to make regular trips, so I'll try hard to master stringing. I'm pumped to do this, it's another way for me to be independent!

Guitarman.
What has been created in the laws of nature holds true in the laws of magic as well. Where there is light, there is darkness,  and where there is life, there is also death.
Aerodyne: first of the wizard order

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2019-09-07 13:26:56

Depending on the electric you have, the process is different depending on the bridge you have. And if anyone wants an easier time changing strings, I highly suggest swapping out stock tuners for a pair of locking ones, whether that be on acoustic or electric. Unless you have an expensive vintage or hardware you feel sentimental about, locking tuners are great not only for easier string changes and a lack of need to wind the string before threading it, but they also help with tuning stability. String changes on an electric vary depending on if you have a tunomatic bridge like on an LP, a two-point trem like a strat or tele, or a Floid Rose which makes it a bit harder because of the additional tuners on the bridge itself.

regards,
assault_freak

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2019-09-07 14:50:40

I've only ever done it with an acoustic, and not seen the tied together strings. Each string had a hole just past the bridge. You put the string through and then put the peg through so it couldn't slip out. It takes maybe 45 seconds to change one string. Now, I don't know about the whole tying strings together, I've never done that and it sounds a bit more complicated.

I'm the captain of this ship,
don't worry about the little clicks,
Everything is working fine,
nevermind that audible whine.

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2019-09-07 15:07:18 (edited by assault_freak 2019-09-07 15:10:51)

You don't tie strings together. lol You tie off the ends around the bridge, and again, that is only with classical guitars, doable because of nylon strings and not steel ones. If you ever look at a nylon string, you'l notice that it's just a length of string with no stop end, so you have to tie it off at the bridge to keep it from slipping. Steel strings have a rounded steel piece at one end which is supposed to help keep them in place, hence the pin and hole setup. Notice also that when you pull a bridge pin, you can see that it has one side with a groove. When reinserting the pin, make sure the groove slots overtop of the string to keep it in place.

regards,
assault_freak

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2019-09-07 17:12:41

Yeah I've never seen that setup. I don't really play guitar, I had one once though. Actually giving it to my brother kickstarted his interest in it and he's been playing for what, 13 or so years now. Best thing I could have done with it.

I'm the captain of this ship,
don't worry about the little clicks,
Everything is working fine,
nevermind that audible whine.

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2019-09-08 14:55:24

how to re-string a guitar:

For acoustic guitars,
1.Set the guitar down on  a table or in your lap with the sound hole facing up.  The sound hole is the large circular hole in the center of the body of the guitar.  Have the neck (fret board) in the direction you would normally play it so that way when you are  looking at the guitar, it'd be in the same position as if you'd be playing it, albeit facing the ceiling.

2. Near, or on  the bridge, the rectangular shaped thing on the opposite side of the sound hole from the fret board, there will be 6 or 12  locking pegs, depending if you have a 6 string or a 12-string guitar.   These pegs can easily be removed with your hands, or if the force is a little greater, a pair of pliers.

3. On the opposite end of the fret board, there will be a headstock,  This is where the tuning pegs are located.  Some guitars will have different setups for this, so bear in mind yours may be a bit different.    Some headstocks, the tuning pegs will al be in a row, or divided with them on the top or bottom.    In most cases, there will be three on top and three on bottom.  .

First, remove the strings from the guitar by either detuning them until you can unwind them from the tuning pegs, then remove them from the locking peg holes  after removing the locking pegs.   Be sure to detune the guitar first, for you don't want those strings coming back and snapping you in the face.

Second, with the new strings, you will place the ball end of the strings into the locking peg hole, then push the peg, with the groove along the string, back into place to hold the string down.  Always be sure your  thickest string is in the position closer to you, or closest to your head when the guitar is in the upright playing position.  Make sure the locking peg is firmly pressed down so it won't pop back out.

Then, run the string down the length of the fret board and slip it through the hole of the  tuning peg closest to the fret board on the top side, if your tuning pegs are along the top and all in a row, or split in to two groups of three.  Place your hand on it's side on about the 12th fret with all fingers close together, then pull the string tension until the string is resting snugly on the side of your hand.  Bend the string fmrily, so the string will have a more difficult time slipping back through the  tuning peg, remove your hand, and start tensioning the string so that the  string is winding around the peg  with the string trailing out along the bottom side of the  peg.  Once it starts to tension enough, be sure to put the string into the respected grooves, both at the bridge end, and headstoc end of the guitar, to keep the string seated in place.

Finally, once string is tight enough it doesn't move easily, then repeat the process with the other strings.  Do not over tighten or try to tune the guitar until all strings are on. 

Note for 12-string guitars:
There will be two grooves right next to each other, for each string set.  The  thinner string rests above the normal string for each string set.  Keep that in mind when  you attempt this monstrosity. 

For nylong/classical guitars, instead of bending the string once through the tuning peg, you will want to tie a knot in the string so it won't slip back through.  All other rules apply though.

For electric guitars w/out a Tremelo system.

A lot of the same applies from acoustic guitars, but at the bridge, there may be one of two ways the strings  slip through.  You still use the ball end of the string, but you, instead will either have to slide it through the body of the guitar with holes that are on the back of it, or you will have to  slide it through a piece on the bridge from the side. 

also, at the headstock, it's possible there could be reverse tuning pegs, where all tuning pegs are on the underside of the headstock.  If that's the case, then the lowest/thickest string  slips through the tuning peg  furthest away from the guitar and be sure all strings are seated through the proper  grooves to keep them in order.

Electric guitars with tremelo locking systems,
You will have to cut the ball end of your string off.  each string will have a plate that is tensioned with a Alan wrench on the bridge.    Just slip the string through and tighten it down.  on the headstock end, same rules apply as any other electric, but be sure to remove the locking nuts  near the headstock before re-stringing.   Once strings are in place, tune the guitar, and replace locking nuts on headstock end.  Use the fine tuners at the bridge end to  precision tune.

Overkill info, but hope this helps.

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2019-09-08 18:24:19

For the record, that depends on the type of trem on the electric... what G-Rad has described is for guitars with what are known as floating tremolo bridges, not the standard fender or gibson designs. Definitely more detailed than the instructions I wrote above, however. smile The only thing I would say is that you should not, on acoustic guitars, just thread the string through the peg without winding it around once first.

regards,
assault_freak

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2019-09-08 20:20:57

My brother's one electric had holes just past the bridge but that went all the way through the body. I'm not sure how that worked, I know the ball on the end of each string is keeping it in there, but I would think it would be sort of difficult to thread each string through that little hole, but maybe not after some practice. The thing I always had to be really careful about when doing it is making sure I get each string onto the correct peg.

I'm the captain of this ship,
don't worry about the little clicks,
Everything is working fine,
nevermind that audible whine.

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2019-09-09 03:41:35

Strings are firm enough they will slip through to the other side.     I used to have a guitar that did that.  One annoyying thing about it though, was that after slipping the strings through, they were designed to go straight through the saddles.  Ugh that was a beesh, because  if the saddle wasn't in the proper place, the string would sip out either side of it.

Recording artist @ Bass Mekanik Records.  Albums available Wherever digital albums are sold.
My YouTube Channel
Drum Covers | Video Game Covers

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2019-09-09 06:52:24

All it takes is practice. I have a similar design for my guitar as well as locking tuners, and I can do a string change in about five minutes, if not less if I actually try and do it fast.

regards,
assault_freak

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2019-09-12 04:35:18

Yeah.  I'm probably about 7-10 minutes with my guitar without locking tuners.   Although I do have a 7 string.

Recording artist @ Bass Mekanik Records.  Albums available Wherever digital albums are sold.
My YouTube Channel
Drum Covers | Video Game Covers

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2019-09-12 05:58:30

That's one more than 6. lol It's not a competition, of course, but your time should be similar. I'd actually be curious to know how fast I could do it.. I should time myself for fun next time. Not counting full tuning of course, just enough to make sure it's stable and stays there.

regards,
assault_freak

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