2021-02-24 01:40:33

Admin here.
Short answer as to why it would or wouldn't get you in trouble:
No, it's very unlikely to get you in trouble. Don't use slurs to refer to people in a derogatory way, try not to demonize whole classes of people based on the actions of a few, and you're good to go.
We've had some extremely hot political topics over the last couple of years, and they were all right. So if it's salient to the situation, by all means share.

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2021-02-24 01:43:18

Vehemently disagree about public schooling. You need an IEP, you need a TVI, and you need your parents to be involved and not be on the sidelines. If you have those things, you'll be good.

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2021-02-24 02:42:12

Hi.
So, prepare for a very long post.
As some of you may know, Africa's population is predominantly made up of, how do I say this?
Is it alright to call them black people/blacks? Sorry, I'm not sure about this.
Anyway, South Africa does have a small white population, most of which speak Afrikaans. I'm white, and I speak English as my first language. So I'm a minority of a minority.
From 1948 to 1994, South Africa had a racial segrigation system called apartheid.
It basically gave the whites all the rights and treated the black people like 4th class citizens.
When it was abolished, it was natural that they should be aforded some opportunities.
However, in recent years, the government launched a program called B E E (Black economic empowerment), which in theory was supposed to support black businesses. However, companies are now hyering not based on the qualifications that you have, but on the color of your skin. My producer was going to do some voice work for a cirtain company and while he was on his way to the studio, his producer was told that they'd decided to hyer the black voice instead.
One of my friends was going to apply for a job, and she had some paperwork with which she presented them. A black lady arrived who apparently could not speak English and she apparently did not have qualifications, and they decided to hyer her instead.
Let me make something very clear. I firmly believe that everyone should be afordedd the same opportunities, regardless of race or political offiliation.
It was what Nelson Mandela fought for, after all.
However, the current administration does not seem to be in agreement.
Of course they won't admit it, but they seem to be pushing us aside.
Again, I'm not saying that black people shouldn't get these jobs, but I'm saying that everybody should be aforded these opportunities regardless of weather they're black or white.
And then there's Julius Malema. He's the leader of the countries third largest political party and he doesn't seem to like us very much.
Let me post a couple videos here.
https://youtu.be/nWhXzS0ZRa8
https://youtu.be/rh9P5XuAVTc
https://youtu.be/GIyvA6CS-m4
Then there's the corruption and don't forget the south african parliament.
All you have to do is search for south african parliament funny moments and there you go.
I hope I did not appear racest by refering to them as black people or any of the things that I said.
If I did, I apologise profusely.

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2021-02-24 03:01:45

Frankly, I use "people of colour" and "black" sort of interchangeably. In my professional capacity, I stick to the former more often than not, since it's a little safer, but I also know plenty of black folks who would prefer to be referred to as black (I've asked). Many aren't picky as long as the language you use isn't being weaponized, and I don't think anybody would take what you just wrote as an attack.
What it sounds like you're telling me is that there's a bit of a rebound effect happening. Apartheid was awful, and after it was dismantled, now it feels a bit like people of colour are getting a leg up that they didn't earn. If you're in the minority in South Africa, I feel for you there. You had no hand in apartheid and clearly aren't racist or whatnot, but you and your family may be adversely impacted.
My gentle advice to you here is to try and be patient. Unless this starts to radicalize and ends up in a system where whites really are being persecuted the way blacks used to be, I expect that this will die down.
The thing I want you to think about - and I am not at all scolding you here, this is tough to wrap your head around, especially when you're young - is the idea of equity. It's very easy to say that everyone should have the same rights, and in the big picture I absolutely, 100% agree with you. But once a particular group has been oppressed for long enough, the damage done to that group becomes multigenerational, leaving families poor, often uneducated, and put in positions where they really have difficulty getting a leg up. So for at least a little while after apartheid ended, I am not surprised that blacks were being favoured a bit; this is the equivalent of someone who was once asked to run a race while hopping on one foot being given a three-second head start because they've essentially become unused to running. Eventually they get used to it again, and stuff levels out. Now, apartheid has been gone for awhile now, but it takes time for the effects to go away completely, and I suspect that there are still older white folks who cling to racism, and older black folks who still have long memories and a bitter taste on their tongue. I don't know the situation well enough in your country to say one way or the other if this is still a rebound effect, or if things have started to radicalize in a bad way against whites (because that can happen, the oppressors become the oppressed, and that's not cool), but just bear it in mind. When oppression ends, you can't instantly go straight to equity. Usually you've got to let the people who were oppressed catch up a little.
I didn't understand this myself till about seven years ago, when I was thirty or so. It still sticks in my craw sometimes. But I do get it.

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2021-02-24 03:09:35

@28
For what it's worth "I live in South Africa" is going to give you tons and tons of "this person probably isn't racist" points.  I haven't looked into that situation, but it's believable to me.  The U.S. is a little bit like that now, but it's fine because here there's a lot of damage being undone by it and we haven't gone so far that it's an issue.  We don't think about it much because the U.S. is and will always be U.S. first, but South Africa being prejudiced against white people after white people fucked them over repeatedly for like 100 or 150 years really does make sense.  That said, I'd be sure to find out how much of it is rumor and people playing up stories, and how much of it is real.  Even people you know are likely to make generalizations and make it sound way worse than it is, so keep that in mind.

Unfortunately for you you will find that immigration isn't so easy.  You're not immigrating before 18 unless you have incredibly exceptional luck.  You're not immigrating after 18 unless you manage to get into a college or have a job that helps you out.  This isn't just the U.S. I'm talking about.  It's most countries.  I looked into going to Canada once, and found out that basically there's a subjective "do we think you'll be a drain on welfare" thing that blocks it if you're disabled most of the time--and that's true of most other countries too.  Like it or not, it's very much a "we care about our citizens first, and you'd better not be a burden" world out there now, and you generally have to prove that you can make your own way.

My advice to you is to figure out if there's anywhere there that's good for blind people to live, basically the U.S. equivalent of Seattle, New York, or San Francisco, as well as some others.  Then, sell your soul to live there.

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Twitter: @ajhicks1992

2021-02-24 03:16:36

Hi. Thanks for explaining everything to me. What really scares me is what is in those videos. While I completely agree with you, those videos make being patient extremely difficult if you know what I mean.

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2021-02-24 03:22:02

I've done a little digging into the situation in South Africa. Obviously, said digging absolutely does not substitute for a lifetime of experience, but this is how it looks to me.

Apartheid itself is gone, but some systemic racism against blacks still exists, even in higher institutions. This is about what I expected. Hate-crimes against blacks are still occurring. Again, not surprising.
On the other hand, it sounds like there are a lot of angry, disenfranchised people of colour who really, really don't like whites in South Africa. Hate-crimes against white people have also been occurring.
I didn't see any data to suggest that getting a job, or going anywhere meaningful, was skewed heavily toward one side or the other. But again, lack of life experience; maybe you have plenty of reason to be worried. Canlorn is right though. A story you heard from your aunt's friend about how they were denied a job over a black person may not be the entire story, and this goes for -anything you hear in that vein. It happens here too; people will turn one situation where a choice was made into the norm about how choices are made, and that's not a great habit to get into.

Check out my Manamon text walkthrough at the following link:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/z8ls3rc3f4mkb … n.txt?dl=1

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2021-02-24 03:31:29

Camlorn, you might want to check out the Canada rule on public charge. They repealed that recently under the new government, so someone disabled shouldn't have a harder time compared to someone who isn't disabled in immigrating. As for the black population getting preferential treatment, I really think it makes alot of sense since they've been opressed so long, its similar to alot of things done in the developed world as well. Like how disabled people, people with more significant impairments are given advantages, extra assistance or preference in hiring for jobs. The disability disadvantage is  so high that all of that doesn't come close to equalizing opertunity.

A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that."

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2021-02-24 03:33:33

As for cities that are very accessible, which cities are good generally? I think the ideal ones for a blind person would be accessible, but with a reasonable cost of living so you don't shell out  2-4k a month just for housing.

A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that."

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2021-02-24 04:01:07

here's the thing.  I know some of the laws changed in some of the places recently.  But the entire immigration process is subjective and is full of stuff like that.  Whether it's written explicitly that disabled people shouldn't be able to get in doesn't really matter as long as the underlying stuff is like that.  Even sighted people effectively can't immigrate without a job on the far side, now.  It's not that immigrating as a blind person is impossible, but at 18 with no college and no job, I doubt it.

As for cities in the U.S. which are good and don't cost a lot?  I've been to Portland (as in Oregon), Portland is very good.  Go to the outskirts of Seattle--Burien for example--and you can be near enough to the light rail to walk and get to downtown and stuff if you don't mind the longer ride and with multiple bedrooms for $1500, which is pretty decent as the U.S. goes.  I haven't done my research in a long while, but Austin, Houston, Atlanta, the right parts of Los Angeles, and Santa barbara all made it onto the list before I started eliminating places that aren't gay-friendly and nerd-friendly.  Boston and Cambridge in Massachusetts are pretty good.  There were some others but it's been a long time.

If the question is what do you want in general?  Public transportation in the shape of what I think of as a spine.  Nothing worse than being somewhere where you're not going to be able to get from one "region" to the other--got a job that's not on your bus routes and you're screwed.  Seattle is nice because we've got a good north/south spine in the light rail, and that's about to cover the east/west direction too.  You probably want somewhere liberal; liberal places are generally more open to including blind people, whether that be jobs or whatever else.  Obviously look for sidewalks and street grids as opposed to street spiderwebs of doom.  If you have a career, you can move to maximize your job opportunities.  One of the most ironic things in my life?  I went to Seattle for that reason and ended up remote for a company in New York.  People who are like you is a big thing, not in terms of blindness but in terms of culture.  Or at least, if you're as weird as I am, I imagine if you're more normal that matters less.  I sort of only halfway succeeded in that with Seattle.  SF would have been way better given who I am, but SF is twice the cost of living for half the space so how about no, at least, not right now.

Basically: you're blind.  That sucks because it took a bunch of opportunities away.  But if you can move and you've decided that's what you're doing, you can move to maximize them.  Naively, this means the amount of surface area you can get to via whatever--say there's a job every 100 square meters of space in a city and you want to reach as many as possible.  You can maximize along the lines of number of people you can meet.  Etc.  But it's kind of a bit individual for everyone, save for broad strokes.

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Twitter: @ajhicks1992

2021-02-24 04:40:45 (edited by Ghost 2021-02-24 04:43:04)

35, I do agree immigration is subjective, but the law explicitly not allowing certain things to be done probably does alot to limit that. If op had a college degree, I think he could immigrate, or it would be worth a try. I also think your post would serve a good guide, to which I will expand on a point. When moving, the place matters alot. I would say in addition to what you said, to avoid red/republican states. Such states generally allocate very little spending towards public services, which would very likely mean bad or nonexistant transit services. I would also avoid the states without an income tax for the same reason. States that  have no income tax, with the exception of Washington, are red states, and as they don't collect revenue from the highest earners in the state,  they use regressive taxes, such as property or sales taxes, which would mean you could be spending a massive boatload of money on sales taxes. But more importantly due to less funds, there likely would be little to no public services and bad infrastructure would be a thing, like the power plants not meeting demand and leavinng people to freeze in the cold, hello Texas?
Such red states have also very few regulations that protect the consumer, like you can be kicked out in  under 2 days in some states from an apartment, or not have any rights to withhold rent if there is a problem that the landlord won't fix that makes the unit uninhabitable.

A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that."

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2021-02-24 15:07:38

I completely agree with everyone, but I do have a question.
Why is it that we whites only here about what they're saying about us?
Why doesn't the government seem to be doing anything about these crimes?
I have reason to believe that there might be descrimination as far as justice is concerned.
I've heard stories of blacks killing whites and either getting away with it or getting comparitively short sentences and whites killing blacks and not only getting much longer sentences, but then the E F F makes a huge scene.
During the lockdown, one of the ministers in government decided that it would be a good idea to ban cigarettes. I have no idea why, but I have some theories.
Either there is a good reason for doing this, or she wanted to sell them on the black market to make a profit.
This is supported by the fact that SA was one of only a few countries that had a ban on cigarettes.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/af … story.html

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2021-02-24 15:11:23

Sorry for the double post, but listen to this rendition of the national anthum.
https://youtu.be/J_sVuwrN-ro

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2021-02-24 15:17:12

Whenever I see anything related to helping the under dog get a leg up, or when I see support black owned businesses popping up on so many web pages, my first thought is, is this a sincere effort? I get the feeling that it's not most of the time, because being woke is trendy and they have to put out something or they'll fall off the gravy train.

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2021-02-24 17:45:45

@37
You only hear what they're saying about you because--you know how they say nothing is faster than bad news?  That's not true.  Nothing is faster than enraging content.  They only hear what you're saying about them, you see.  For exactly the same reasons.  With all due respect, thinking how you are is a fast road to becoming one of those crazy far insert-side-here radicals.  Step back, cool off, and actively seek out things that disprove your viewpoints, and your perspective on this whole thing will probably change.

You're doing exactly the thing where you let Google and Youtube and your circle of friends control what you find out about.  All that's ever going to do is give you reasons to be angry.  Google, Youtube, Facebook, and so on, they literally make money off that.  20-30 years ago it still happened but you didn't have to actively seek out other viewpoints.  Now you do because the algorithms are feeding you and everyone you know "engaging content".  The algorithms don't care if it's true.  The algorithms don't care if it's good for society.  Anger gets you to keep watching, so anger is what you get.  And even if not you--well, are the people you hear this from actively challenging their viewpoints, or just reading their Facebook feeds and saying whatever they saw?  Given that lots of otherwise intelligent people I know totally just repeat what was on Facebook, I bet it's the latter.

I'd stop seeking out youtube videos and start seeking out objective content.  This is especially true if you don't understand why someone would want to ban cigarettes.  If you don't know how bad cigarettes are for you, then somewhere along this path you missed out on a whole chunk of really important world knowledge and should take that as a sign that your research skills here are suspect.

Cigarette bans are a good idea Covid or otherwise, and if you don't understand why then you should educate yourself on just how bad cigarettes are.  It's literally the only industry where we say "yeah, that's fine, sell literal poison as long as you put a thing on the box saying this will kill you dead and once you've done it for a couple months you will be unable to stop".  I'm not saying there weren't ulterior motives, but given that it's basically impossible to ban cigarettes even though the cigarette companies themselves know it'll kill you--well, ulterior motive is fine by me.

Also: yes smoking puts you at risk from Covid, that's one of the few indisputable findings we've had since near the beginning.  Smoking puts others at risk from covid because you will be coughing all the time.  Don't buy into the "I'm desperate because I got addicted" stuff.  They got addicted because we let companies sell something that is addictive and it kills you and you get nothing else from it but you can't stop and die slowly.  Talk to smokers sometime, most of them will say they know it's really bad for them and that you shouldn't do it but that they can't stop in a "well, it's too late" tone (that is, if they don't just say it's too late outright).

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2021-02-24 18:02:16

40, actually, turkey tried to ban  cigarettes, they did it indoors, but restaurants found a way around it by putting up a tent and claiming that wasn't indoors. Banning cigarettes is a really really good idea. When I was attending college in Turkey, cigarette usage amoung people there was really trendy, and the number of people who smoke was like 70% of the population that was torture for me because of my asthma, since it was illegal indoors, they'd take 1 step outside and start puffıng.Smokıng is even worse for someone exposed to it than the smoker because of secondhand smoke.

A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that."

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2021-02-24 18:27:12

In large cities in the U.S. it's effectively banned, because most new apartment buildings are smoke-free communities and lots of states are starting to adopt regulations about having to be a certain distance from the door and stuff.  Unfortunately this hits weed too, but big difference between "I need to smoke twice a day, better go out in the snow" or whatever and "let's hang out in the park with friends on Friday".

But we'll never do it nationwide because the cigarette companies have huge piles of money to burn.  Frankly, if I was an evil asshole I'd go start one.  Nothing like a perfectly legal product that your customers can't ever stop buying, just leave the ethics at the door.

Admittedly cigars are better, but not better by enough that I consider them really justified.  but maybe better by enough that we should keep them around as a bridge for people who need to stop, or something.

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2021-02-24 19:13:04

Canlorn, you hit on something interesting there.
I use Facebook. I have all kinds of fun with YouTube. But I also read articles and do my own research. And a lot of it comes from news sources I don't like. News sources that are right-leaning, where I'm not. I do this very deliberately because the media has a habit of sensationalizing fucking -everything these days. I trust myself to take information from multiple sources and sort of make a picture that's probably semi-accurate; it's very, very rare that I get fully sucked into either side's hyperbolic rhetoric. This is one of the reasons I debate stuff so readily and am willing to have my viewpoints challenged.
Take police brutality in America, for instance. I shared a post yesterday talking about a black man who was stopped for jaywalking, then bodily tackled when he tried to flee. A struggle ensued, and he was shot dead. I was livid, both because it was yet another black person victimized by the cops and because cops routinely get away with this sort of thing, regardless of the victim. If you listen to leftist media, police brutality is pretty much entirely a racial problem. If you listen to right-wing media, black people do far more harm to one another than anyone else, so all this police brutality crap is just overblown. The truth is more nuanced. Police brutality, the excessive use of unwarranted force, is just too common across the board. Non-whites are disproportionately represented, it's true, but it happens to white people as well, and it's wrong no matter who it happens to.

So why am I mentioning this here? Because I see a bit of what I'm going to call "funnel logic" happening regarding blacks in South Africa. By "funnel logic", I mean that you get pushed from multiple angles toward a desired viewpoint by the sources of media you trust; this usually applies most aptly when you get most of your info from either one extreme or another. You get funnelled toward outrage of one form or another because you don't know how to break yourself free of the spin. In your case, RTT, it might be advantageous of you to look up reputable news sources that are more sympathetic toward South African blacks. The situation in your country looks bad from virtually all sides, from my outsider's perspective. Whites are busy hating blacks, blacks are busy hating whites, and it's clear that decades of apartheid are still echoing around, causing mistrust, anger, resentment and feelings of betrayal. This is going to take awhile.

And in the meantime, here's what you do. Rather than focus on how you might get screwed over as a white person, focus on improving yourself as a person, full stop. Get your skills. Improve yourself. Give yourself the best possible shot at success. Maybe this means educating your parents, but maybe it means toughing it out till you can get out on your own. Maybe it means really working on those life skills and finding a reason to feel proud of yourself, instead of painting yourself into a corner where it feels like you're doomed to fail before you even begin. Because here's the deal, dude. You are going to fail. More than once. And probably spectacularly, if you're anything like the rest of us. I bet you most of us have colossally fucked stuff up before. But we figure it out. We learn from it. We become better for it, if for no other reason than that we say to ourselves, "Okay, wow, never doing that again". If you're stuck in one place because you're afraid to fail, you're coming at it bass ackward. You will not succeed, ever, if you don't try. Trying does not necessarily mean fleeing, either. It means confronting your biases (we all have them). It means getting a leg up on the stuff you can improve, putting aside the stuff that is truly out of your reach, and establishing yourself: your perspective, your goals if you have any, your state of mind. And remember, above all else I think, that life is change. If what you believe now turns out to fall apart in three years, and you find you are looking in different places for your success and your inspiration, that's completely natural. You are not locking yourself onto one path, forever and ever, amen. You are trying to find the right first step. And everything after that is just finding that next step, wherever it leads. Don't dream too big. Dream real. You'll get there.

Check out my Manamon text walkthrough at the following link:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/z8ls3rc3f4mkb … n.txt?dl=1

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2021-02-24 19:53:28

yeah.  I will just add that there's a lot of people around here who seem to feel pressure to know who they are and what they want at 16 or thereabout.  No one manages that.  I didn't realize I was gay until I was like 23, never mind more complex life stuff.

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2021-02-24 20:05:16

Basically what camlorn said. I don't know of any examples of what you're talking about. Can you mention any case where a black person got away with or got a light sentence for murdering a white person? Racial hate crimes aren't really a common occurrence here as far as I know, and given how much the few that do happen are sensationalised I suspect we're not missing a lot of them. We do have a big issue with crime in general, but I'm not sure what crime you're specifically referring to that you want the government to do something about.
As for the cigarette ban, the idea that NDZ did that because she benefits from blackmarket sails is pretty popular, but there isn't any evidence to support it. It obviously isn't impossible, but NDZ has been anti-smoking for a long time and she has been responsible for stronger regulation of smoking since the 90s. If she did all that just so she could eventually get kickbacks from illegal sails during a pandemic then she's been playing a very long game.
As for BEE, like others said something needs to happen to allow people to catch up. During apartheid black people were segregated into townships far from economic opportunities, with city CBDs being reserved as white-only areas. Many black people only got what was called a bantu education, which was intended to only prepare you for menial jobs. And unfortunately very little is free in this country, including a quality education. So the big thing for me is that if you are poor, uneducated and live far from where the jobs and good schools are, then your children have a good chance of ending up the same. You need to break that cycle somehow. Also you get points for being disabled so it would actually work in your favour.
But are you sure that the black person was less qualified than the white person in all the cases you've heard? Because I've seen white people using it as an excuse, like "I didn't get the bursary because I'm white" even though there are black people with better marks who also didn't get a bursary. There seems to be a kind of victim mentality that has set in among some white people where they seem to believe the world is against them. Not saying this is you, just that it's a trend I've noticed and you might be hearing from these people. If you look at a racial breakdown of unemployment statistics you'll see the white unemployment rate is the lowest and the black rate the highest, so this system clearly can't be too unfavourable to white people getting jobs.
Regarding Malema, he's a populist and does what populists tend to do. But if you look at the EFF's electoral results they don't seem likely to be in a position of power any time soon. Since it's a relatively young party compared to most of the rest it's hard to really look at their growth trajectory, but I suspect they're nearing their ceiling.

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2021-02-24 20:10:20

@Jayde, the "people of colour" thing is interesting, because in South Africa coloured is a racial category. We've traditionally had four main racial categories: black, coloured, white and indian.

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2021-02-24 20:10:51

Ok so before I even say anything here, I fully agree with the sentiment that people who smoke indoors, around other people, without any form of consent are assholes. It will never bother me personally, but there are perfectly understandable reasons why others might not be OK with it. The same somewhat holds true of vaping, although the latter is kind of a weird one, since the etiquette surrounding it is kind of all over the place, and largely comes down to individual discretion. My family, for instance, have no problem with me vaping in my bedroom since it doesn't bother them, and I'm not liable to set off any smoke alarms in here because my pen's cloud production is next to nothing. Most of the time it's not even obvious that I've recently done it say for a little bit of a room note, though that last one may be flavor dependant.
@Ghost, I think your post is a perfect example of why cigarettes *shouldn't* be banned. People will just find ever more desperate ways to get their fix. Also? Nicotine withdrawal is a *huge* problem. It's not just a, oh bummer, I really want a fag, but I can't get one any more, continue living type of affair, more of a, shit I need my fag now now now and my entire body is shaking and my ADHD is outdoing itself aaaaaaaa, type of affair. I agree that cigarettes are bad for the environment and all, but as are so many things. Think of the amount of plastic containers you buy containing who knows what every week at the supermarket, for example. Vaping would be the ideal substitute, but it's also an extremely different sensation, even MTL, and not everyone is going to like it.
Also, I'm sure many of you here drink coffee. Perhaps several cups a day, if you're anything like myself. It's, not quite up there with Nicotine as regards addiction, but it's pretty dam close. It definitely is addicting, no question about that, just look at the amount of people who literally need their fix in the morning.

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2021-02-24 20:24:29

And as far as coffee goes? Just think of how a lot of it is sourced. I see problematic elements in a lot of daily consumables: cigarettes, coffee, alcohol, soft drinks, the lot of it, really. We are a consumer culture, through and through, and it's disgusting.

Check out my Manamon text walkthrough at the following link:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/z8ls3rc3f4mkb … n.txt?dl=1

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2021-02-24 22:00:51 (edited by RTT entertainment 2021-02-24 22:02:21)

I understand. I just wish that people wouldn't always play the race card. It's terrible and I apologise if I may have come across in a negative way. Thanks for explaining, I think I feel a little better about this country now.

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https://youtu.be/KKF0rWuBbBs

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2021-02-24 22:14:43

47, coffee on the other hand is very different from cigarettes. It doesn't cause lung cancer in the people who sit around someone drinking it. Just because people get addicted to something doesn't mean it shouldn't be banned iether. If anything,  thats an even more strong case to bann it.
As for apartments, smoke free only applies in the apartments, but people can still smoke outdoors and in the open areas, and if they smoke enough, like neighbors who smoke tons, I have to actually close windows because of the amount of smoke out there.

A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that."

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