2019-06-07 00:08:52

So, I’m sorry if this question is Rather obvious to answer, but I will ask anyways.  How would I go about using raspberry pie? What kind of screen readers can be installed on it?  Surely it is accessible.  Though, I am not too sure. All I know about it is that it uses a commandline interface, and can have things installed and or ran on it. Somebody described it as a miniature computer with limited functionality.  Would you say that such an explamation would be accurate?  Again, I’m sorry of these questions are rather basic. I will get a chance to work with the device rather soon, and I want to know more information about it beforehand.

Coding is not hard. No, not at all.
What is hard is making code that accepts different and sometimes unexpected types of input and still works.
This is what truly takes a large amount of effort on a developer's part.

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2019-06-07 02:10:59

I am currently using a raspberry pi 0wh, and or is it a raspberry pi 0w. I forget at the second. Anyway, I would say that it is a cheap miniature computer. I have mine set up so that I can SSH into it. You can get versions of the OS that has a GUI. I do not know about screen readers seeing that I am not running one on mine. I do not need to run one on mine seeing that I basically have it sitting in the corner preforming one task for me. That task is basically a radio link to the net. That is to say relaying  any signals from my two-way radio over the net. Anyway, rather or not you need a screen reader will depend on what you want to do with it. Setting it up as a router, you will most likely not need a screen reader, but setting it up to use as a cheap desktop computer then you will need one of some kind. Yes, I thought I saw somewhere where you can use these as a router, but I personally would not recommend it. Basically, these can be used as cheap computers for small tasks, to robots, to network attached storage, to ETC. Hope that helps some.

All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost. From the ashes a fire shall be woken, A light from the shadows shall spring; Renewed shall be blade that was broken, The crownless again shall be king.
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2019-06-07 02:54:35

Since the Raspberry Pi normally can run Linux, you can install screen readers like Orca.
I personally don't have one installed on mine, mostly because I have a bit of sight to navigate, and plus I mostly use mine to play retro games with RetroPie installed.
The most powerful one that's available right now is the Raspberry Pi 3 B+.

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2019-06-07 04:09:17

Can I connect something to the machine and control it from my computer?
Post three: is there a quick summary of orca commands available somewhere?  Stuff like changing the rate, pulling up the preferences menu, etc.  Also,  where could I download it?

Coding is not hard. No, not at all.
What is hard is making code that accepts different and sometimes unexpected types of input and still works.
This is what truly takes a large amount of effort on a developer's part.

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2019-06-07 04:21:08

I found this when I searched for commands for Orca.
https://help.gnome.org/users/orca/stabl … ds.html.en
As for installing and downloading Orca, I'm not sure as I haven't looked into it much.
Also, in your question of "Can I connect something to the machine and control it from my computer?" What exactly do you mean by this?

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2019-06-07 07:12:29 (edited by magurp244 2019-06-07 07:14:18)

How you can connect to it from your computer largely depends on the model of raspberry pi. For most of them use can use an Ethernet cable or Wifi to tunnel in over SSH from your computer, but with the Raspberry Pi Zero W version you'll have to rely on wifi as it doesn't have any Ethernet ports. When you get the Pi, you'll likely have to setup a microSD card with an image if it isn't already, you can enable SSH and setup the Wifi while the cards plugged into your computer. There's a guide [here] that explains how to set it up.

For the Orca setup there's a guide over on [Raspberry VI], which is a community centered around accessible Raspberry Pi topics.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

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2019-06-07 17:11:20

Orca can be installed with apt-get; the package manager for the default raspberry pi image is apt-get, just as in Debin and Ubuntu. For Arch, there's pacman, which is identical -- pacman -S orca.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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2019-06-07 17:46:55 (edited by Chris 2019-06-07 17:47:43)

Wait, so you can run sudo apt-get install orca from distros like Raspbian? Really! How do you install a text-to-speech engine like eSpeak? How do you start Orca once installed?

Grab my Adventure at C: stages Right here.
You may access my NVDA Remote, Three-D Velocity, Sound RTS, and Road to Rage servers by using the address christopherw.me. Road to Rage uses the default 6789 port.

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2019-06-09 22:31:20 (edited by amerikranian 2019-06-09 22:31:54)

@Magurp
So after talking to somebody who will be working with me I have some more questions:
1: What app do I need to use to be able to connect to the pie? I heard of SSH, but from what I understand it is a prodocall and thus needs an app that uses it.
2: SSH is CMD based. Do I need anything else for it to work properly?
3: I tried to find the guide mentioned for setting up Orca on the website that you linked to, but the closest I've found is E-speak and I didn't manage to find a download link for it. Could you point me in the right direction?
4: I also figured out that I will be using Linux on the pie. Trouble is that I don't have much experience with it. Any tips and tricks are greatly appreciated

Coding is not hard. No, not at all.
What is hard is making code that accepts different and sometimes unexpected types of input and still works.
This is what truly takes a large amount of effort on a developer's part.

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2019-06-09 23:18:03 (edited by Chris 2019-06-09 23:19:16)

There are many guides on the Internet for using Linux at the command line. It's really hard to give you precise instructions, because there are many things you can do with a Raspberry Pi. I personally only want to get one to use as a cheap NAS, but I'm waiting until they come out with a version that has USB 3.0 ports and true Gigabit Ethernet.

Grab my Adventure at C: stages Right here.
You may access my NVDA Remote, Three-D Velocity, Sound RTS, and Road to Rage servers by using the address christopherw.me. Road to Rage uses the default 6789 port.

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2019-06-09 23:35:47

I have a friend who has one, and it doesn't have a screenreader, IDK the model, he was trying to code something that will make espeak speak the prompts though.

Ty

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2019-06-10 01:08:58 (edited by magurp244 2019-06-10 01:28:19)

@9
the Orca setup is a bit of a hack and requires a USB Audio Dongle, but you can find it [here] under the Mate Desktop guide. For SSH, the Raspi Foundation seems to recommend [Putty], though you could also try installing [OpenSSH].

As for tips and tricks, well there are others here with alot more experience with linux, heh. There's a few lists on the terminal functions you might find useful though [here], [here], and [here], if it helps.

@10
Look into the [Odroid], its 60$ but has 3.0 USB ports and gigabit ethernet, same size and functionality as the raspi.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

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2019-06-10 01:22:46

I am wondering how accessible is open SSH? Just wondering. I know that Putty can be a bit of a pain with JAWS. For whatever the reason, JAWS will not read the movement with my arrow keys in putty. Do not get me wrong, I can use the JAWS or invisible cursor to review the screen. This is mainly a problem when I want to edit things via the command line. The VIM editor on Linux is one such case. Editing a config file on my Pi is another such case.

All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost. From the ashes a fire shall be woken, A light from the shadows shall spring; Renewed shall be blade that was broken, The crownless again shall be king.
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2019-06-10 01:37:29

@13
It seems as though OpenSSH is used through windows powershell, so it likely would be as accessible as powershell is, though I can't confirm anything. From the Raspberry VI starters section under Host Software [here], Tera-Term is listed as a another ssh client that might be a bit more usable than Putty.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

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2019-06-10 02:02:45

@13, use NVDA object navigation.

Ty

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2019-06-10 12:44:36 (edited by cw 2019-06-10 13:48:31)

As far as I can tell, there is a difference between NVDA's object navigation and the cursor that your arrow keys moves. Basically, whenever I am editing something through SSH, I need my insertion point moved around on the device I am controlling. Putty is nice enough to send my arrow keys through. Either putty is not nice enough to clew JAWS in, or JAWS is not nice enough to clew me in. I did say that the JAWS or invisible cursor is good enough to read the screen to me. I will have to check out tera-term to see how useable it would be for me. Thanks for the site.
Edit
Ok, trying out tera-term now. Looks to work a lot better for me. Already tried scrolling through commands giving and it seemed to work ok. Did left and right errows and that seemed to do ok too. Only problem there is that JAWS seemed to do alot of repeating it self when sitting on a char. Anyway, thanks for pointing this out.

All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost. From the ashes a fire shall be woken, A light from the shadows shall spring; Renewed shall be blade that was broken, The crownless again shall be king.
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2019-06-10 16:55:01 (edited by Hijacker 2019-06-10 16:55:48)

Some things I just want to add:
* SSH is more accessible than Putty, and its already included in Windows 10, thus you don't need to install anything if you want to use it and are already running Windows 10.
* Raspi Zero and Zero W can be used via USB too and don't necessarily need to be accessed via WiFi. One of the USB ports of the Raspi 0 is a bridge port which acts as a network device as well. Connecting it to a Windows system and feeding it the correct drivers will end up being a network device and allowing you to SSH into it directly if you don't know how to configure it to use your local WiFi, or maybe even don't want to do that.
Best Regards.
Hijacker

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2019-06-10 19:35:10

I am running windows 7 at this time. I have brought up tera-term and tried to do a little bit of editing a file. JAWS seemed to have gone nuts I pasted in my first change. Closing JAWS to bring up NVDA seemed to had closed tera-term. Not to sure what is going on there. May see if I can try that USB trick. I not to sure if it is the software I am running on the pi, but I am trying to get in there to disable the power saving mode on the wifi network interface. May have to reimage the thing seeing that I seem to do a reboot when ever the thing disappears from the wifi. Of course, powering the thing off at the wrong time can cause trouble.

All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost. From the ashes a fire shall be woken, A light from the shadows shall spring; Renewed shall be blade that was broken, The crownless again shall be king.
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2019-06-12 02:10:23 (edited by amerikranian 2019-06-12 02:14:11)

@12: I got to using Lynix with the SSH, and it's pretty fun. I still would like to get orka working, though. Opening the guide you linked to, I see the following line:
This requires a USB audio dongle to work in the desktop.
What is the USB audio dongle? Also, what format should I have my file in, because it's just a bear script on the page which I'm not quite sure what to do with.
Also, I see a line with the letters fi and nothing else. Is that a tipo, or is it meant to be that way?

Coding is not hard. No, not at all.
What is hard is making code that accepts different and sometimes unexpected types of input and still works.
This is what truly takes a large amount of effort on a developer's part.

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2019-06-12 02:59:12

19 I do not know if if every pi is like mine, but my pi does not have a sound card. So if I wanted to run orka,  I will need some kind of audio. So, I think you need to ask what USB audio devices work with the pi. Then Maybe I should ask that? LOL. Anyway, think USB power headphone or the Olympus ds30 audio recorder or something else... To tell you the trooth, I am not to sure what USB sound cards work with the pi.

All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost. From the ashes a fire shall be woken, A light from the shadows shall spring; Renewed shall be blade that was broken, The crownless again shall be king.
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2019-06-12 03:16:27 (edited by amerikranian 2019-06-12 03:17:36)

Can't I just plug my headphones into the headphone jack and get the audio that way?

Coding is not hard. No, not at all.
What is hard is making code that accepts different and sometimes unexpected types of input and still works.
This is what truly takes a large amount of effort on a developer's part.

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2019-06-12 03:27:23

Hi.
@20, most, if not all, Raspberry Pi models don't have a built-in sound card.
@21 yes, you can plug in some speakers into the 3.5mm audio jack and you should get sound. One can also plug in an HDMI display to get both video and sound, but since sound is more important here you should be fine with the 3.5mm audio jack.

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2019-06-12 05:20:32

No, I mean headphones. I have a set of headphones that I plan to plug into the unit.  Would that essentially   eliminate  the need for the purchase of a sound card?  I just want to make sure that going through the pain of setting up a screen reader will be worth it.

Coding is not hard. No, not at all.
What is hard is making code that accepts different and sometimes unexpected types of input and still works.
This is what truly takes a large amount of effort on a developer's part.

Thumbs up

2019-06-12 10:09:00 (edited by magurp244 2019-06-12 10:14:32)

With the Orca setup, console audio will come out of the analog audio jack, but speech on the graphical desktop uses an external audio dongle. No dongle, no desktop speech. You can find a few [here] and [here] for about 5 ish dollars, shipping not included.

As for the script, in raspbian instead of batch files its [Shell Script], the link gives instructions on how to make and run them. Next you copy/paste the script into a shell script file and run it in the console, it then tells you to type a few extra lines so it auto starts Orca when the desktop loads:

dbus-launch gsettings set org.mate.interface accessibility true
dbus-launch gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.a11y.applications screen-reader-enabled true

After that it talks about how you can change the GREETER= parameter in the script to automatically load the desktop on startup, but if you leave it blank you can just type "startx" on the console to load the desktop environment.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

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2019-06-12 12:50:40

I have been playing around a bit with my PI and I am starting to wonder if I got a bad card in it or something. I keep on having to reboot too much. Should have another card on the way. Anyway, what are some good signs that you may see if the card is going bad? Tried powering it via the PC and powering it via the wall's AC outlet. The thing keeps on dropping off wifi or something. I really did see it drop off my IPhone’s connection. The image I am running does boot into an access point mode when it is not near a known network. When it does that, it makes it a bit easier when connecting it up to a network. Funny thing is, it is willing to transmit its’ SSID all day while refusing connection to it after a short time. Kind of making me thing that it might be freezing or something. Anyway, I figure that all of us may deal with bad cards from time to time. The image I am running is over here.

All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost. From the ashes a fire shall be woken, A light from the shadows shall spring; Renewed shall be blade that was broken, The crownless again shall be king.
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