2021-02-17 11:31:22 (edited by magurp244 2021-02-22 00:16:43)

As reported by [teslarati]:

NASA's rover is nearing Mars, and is about to begin its decent to the surface with a powered landing, oft referred to at NASA as "7 minutes of terror", as for 7 minutes they will have noway to communicate with the rover to determine if it survived. Some of you may remember that Perseverance is the same rover equipped with special microphones recording its [journey through space] that will also be used to record not just its entry through the atmosphere, but the sounds of Mars itself.

You can watch the event on NASA TV [here] starting at 11:15 am PST, as well as on Youtube, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitch, Daily Motion, Theta.TV, and the NASA app.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

Thumbs up +5

2021-02-17 14:34:48

wow sounds quite stressfull...

best regards
never give up on what ever you are doing.

2021-02-17 15:19:05

The spacecraft will be landing in the planet’s Jezero crater, as confirmed by engineers managing the mission from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.
The terrain of the Jezero crater makes it the most difficult landing on Mars as it has steep cliffs, sand dunes, and boulder fields. If the landing is successful, the team handling the mission will know it seven minutes after the touchdown.
The Perseverance rover will first get rid of the extra load and enter the top of the Martian atmosphere at 19,500 km per hour. It will also have NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter attached to it. The spacecraft will heat up to 1,300-degree Celsius before it is in a position to deploy the parachute. Despite high temperatures, the rover will remain safe as it is protected by an aeroshell keeping it at room temperature.
Nearly 20 seconds after the parachute is out, the bottom of the capsule will detach itself and then the rover will use its Terrain-Relative Navigation technology to find a spot for a safe landing. Once the landing site is identified, the rover will get rid of the parachute and use retrorockets to fly to it. Finally, the rover will descent at a speed as slow as 2.7 km per hour and then get lowered to the ground.
There is very little mission control can do to help the Perseverance rover land as it will be using pre-planned landing instructions. The rover will spend up to 687 days on Mars collecting samples and studying the Jezero crater, which will help to uncover the history of the crater. It will also be sending photos of the planet. On the other hand, the Ingenuity Mars helicopter will collect samples from places where the rover cannot reach.

Thumbs up +3

2021-02-18 01:24:20 (edited by magurp244 2021-02-18 02:12:13)

If anyone is interested in the story of the Perseverence rovers microphone, there's a recent interesting article on [wired] that covers how an LA Musician, Jason Achilles Mezilis, helped design the microphone for the project.

edit: Also a video from Mark Rober [here] who previously worked at NASA, who gives a breakdown of the project.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

Thumbs up +1

2021-02-18 05:29:24

@3 why would they choose to land there if it was one of the hardest places?

Discord, pkpkpkpkpk#8930. yeah it's stupid, but it's a stupid name for a stupid person, so.

Thumbs up

2021-02-18 05:38:34 (edited by magurp244 2021-02-18 05:40:22)

@5
Life. Or rather, the possible presence of life that may have existed on Mars. Jezero crater appears to have once been a water filled lake, and using earth as a guide scientists believe the best chance at finding evidence that life might have existed is at the base of a river, which appears to connect at one of the points of the crater. This isn't the only reason mind, there are a number of scientific projects onboard, including an experimental aerial drone, but searching for life is one of the primary objectives.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

Thumbs up

2021-02-18 18:07:11

hello, at what time will it land on mars today?

recreational activities that I like to do are listening to Music like to play Casio and also I like to socially interact with people

Thumbs up

2021-02-18 22:17:00

I think roughtly in about 30 minutes to an hourish, according to [ars] touchdown is scheduled for 3:55pm EST, and its currently 3:14pm EST.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

Thumbs up

2021-02-18 23:16:33

The cosmic object you are looking for has disappeared beyond the event horizon.

Thumbs up

2021-02-19 01:59:55

Wait a cosmic object?
It has already landed...

Just discovered Mars vision!

Thumbs up

2021-02-19 05:32:35 (edited by Green Gables Fan 2021-02-22 21:25:57)

This article explains a little bit about the microphones onboard Perseverence. I surely hope NASA can make those sound files available so we can experience the EDL landing, the rover's motors, and possibly what Mars sounds like! It would be different with only CO2 being the kind of atmosphere. If I understand correctly, NASA is covered under FOIA, so they have to release almost everything to the general public, unless it involves something controversial. But from what I understand, they have an FTP site.
Update1: I believe that site is ftp://marsnt3.jpl.nasa.gov/marswatch/upload
Update2: Here's another link to download the interplanetary sounds from Perseverence. https://mars.nasa.gov/resources/25399/p … ry-sounds/

Ulysses, KJ7ERC
She/they
AKA TheHarmonicRainbow and HeavenlyHarmony
Reedsy

2021-02-19 09:24:19

I believe there working on downloading the video and audio through orbital support craft, at least until the rovers main communications antenna is deployed. They're also uploading the navigation software that was still being worked on after launch, so it may be a few days before it can get up and running.

If anyones interested in learning more about the experimental drone and how it works though, there's a breakdown of that [here], including what it sounds like in a martian like atmosphere. Fun fact, it only has enough power reserved for 90 seconds of flight.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

Thumbs up

2021-02-19 15:20:45

And here's when a bit of patriotic spirit comes up.
Yesterday I found on BBC that the person responsible for  doing some things on this project, is a woman from my country, Colombia. that's freakin awesome!

Jesus Christ is the way, the truth and the life. he gives to the human being complete joy and happyness. Why don't you receive him today?

2021-02-19 17:48:18

Things like this are inspiring for sure, and they do advance humanity. But it's still hard not to think about the hundreds of millions of people suffering abject poverty around the world while we play around in space with funds we partially got from selling weapons and could be using on our poor education system and wealth inequality problems here.

Thumbs up

2021-02-19 18:04:00

We're destroying this place and need a way to get off it eventually. space exploration is inevitable. There will always be poverty, the haves and have nots. That's life.

Join me in eliminating BGT from the forum.
It's very easy, if you see a topic about BGT, simply don't reply to it.
If you're thinking about creating a topic about BGT, just don't.
Doing these things will cause all such topics to sink to oblivion.

Thumbs up

2021-02-20 06:48:52

Well, here is the best article for you.
And I do eventually believe we can change the Mars atmosphere if we grew lots of trees and stuff, but while we wait for Earth's climate to recover into global cooling, we will have to live there. Then our future generations can go back to Earth once again.
I heard George Carlin's Save the effing planet speech, by the way. Surprisingly, he predicted, or merely implied, that we would get into a pandemic.

Ulysses, KJ7ERC
She/they
AKA TheHarmonicRainbow and HeavenlyHarmony
Reedsy

2021-02-20 07:58:37

I'm just going to let Mark Rober cover the value proposition of NASA [here].

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

Thumbs up

2021-02-20 10:14:48

it's intriguing i have to admit but i can tell you the results of all that money strait away. it's dusty, there's  fuck all there but we got some pretty pictures.

if duct tape doesn't fix it, you haven't used enough.

Thumbs up

2021-02-21 12:13:24

@20 well we discovered evidence of water on mars, it is quite likely that microscopic life once lived there, seeing as mars was once like earth.

to know the true limits of some thing, you must first stretch the current limits to breaking point. which is to say, you can never find some thing's true limits until your imagination breaks.
discord: blind lightning #4447
twitter: @lightning_blind

Thumbs up

2021-02-21 12:32:11

@21 and your point is? there's nothing there now and if there is microscopic life there, do we want it here? you've seen what the latest corona virus has done. i'm thinking if there's bacteria or viruses on other planets, let them stay where they are. we don't want them.

if duct tape doesn't fix it, you haven't used enough.

Thumbs up

2021-02-21 13:00:38

Hi,

I actually watched a really interesting documentary  called the secrets of the super elements (wow that one sentence makes me sound incrediblly boring  hahaha) it was really interesting though, it focused on some of the natural resources/elements we all use on a daily basis, that we rely on and take for granted, but that in fact are really rare and that we only have a very limited supply of on our own planet. Interestingly it wasn’t about what you might think i.e Oil, gas etc, but actually focused on what it described as the new super elements, elements which are needed to make things like  computer chips, even an element which is used in the production of touch screens , the documentary suggests that some of these elements we may only have as little as a twenty years supply of. I’m not a scientist so not sure how true all of these claims are, but the end of the documentary suggests that if we want to keep enjoying a lot of the luxuries we enjoy and take for granted today, like cheap air travel, smart phones and much more that the answer probably lies in the stars, with big bucks to be made for which ever companies or government agency  can lay claim to, with things like other planets and meteoroids potentially holding a wealth of these super elements , along with other elements yet undiscovered which might push the boundaries of science even further. I think it was a BBC documentary (although not 100% sure on that), but its also on YouTube if anyone is interested the link is:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-aPwGflqlA

Paul lemm

Thumbs up

2021-02-21 15:02:19

@22 well, we want to see if life ever existed, it is so unlikely that anything i living there now that we don't really ahve to worry about that

to know the true limits of some thing, you must first stretch the current limits to breaking point. which is to say, you can never find some thing's true limits until your imagination breaks.
discord: blind lightning #4447
twitter: @lightning_blind

Thumbs up

2021-02-22 00:15:12 (edited by magurp244 2021-02-22 00:15:22)

NASA is going to share the new video and images recovered from Mars Monday, February 22nd at 1:00pm EST, during a livestream event they've scheduled.

You can watch the livestream [here], which starts in 20 hours as of this post.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

Thumbs up

2021-02-23 03:26:47

The conference finished earlier today. Sadly, it turns out the EDL microphone failed to record the descent, however they have managed to record the sounds of the rovers surroundings on Mars. The relevant part of the stream starts around the 38 minute mark.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

Thumbs up

2021-02-23 03:48:36

if we can harvest things we need from another planet, it raises all kinds of problems. we have broken our planet and so to build on another world will take centuries as we gradually move people to find the things we need to just carry on moving more people. just to shift 10000 people to start building a biosphere on mars would take a smace ship at least 3 times the size of the queen mary 2 ocean liner to carry people, food and fuel plus things they would need to start building. that is probably a huge under estimate. unless scientists come up with new forms of power, i don't think we can do it.

if duct tape doesn't fix it, you haven't used enough.

Thumbs up