2019-09-08 20:11:53

I have been meaning to ask this question for a while but well, i kind of forgot about it. What is the best speech synthesizer that i can use while i am writing. Vocalizer Nathan isn't the best for that job
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it can be free or payed. It doesn't matter. I'll have the money soon anyways
thanks

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2019-09-09 00:35:53

I personally use espeak, but vocalizer ava for everything else. Do not, for the love of god, use eloquence. While it can speak fast, you'll probably end up spelling loads of things wrong and thinking you spelled them right.

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2019-09-09 00:44:01

maybe Acapella if you don't mind paying, but the NVDA add-on is quite expensive. I do like a few of the voices though.

The glass is neither half empty nor half full. It's just holding half the amount it can potentially hold.

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2019-09-09 20:37:04

I use Vocalizer Ioana or Microsoft Andrei for Romanian and Espeak for Italian and English.

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2019-09-10 03:51:33

When writing, and especially while proofreading and correcting your work, I would highly recommend a Braille display. Reading in Braille can help you correct relatively easy mistakes that you could overlook when using speech. For example, writing "there" instead of "their" and vice versa, along with a bunch of other simple mistakes. It can also help you reinforce correct punctuation and paragraph use. If not, I'd suggest using eSpeak NG to write and proofread. If you're looking for a more natural speech synthesizer, try Vocalizer.

PS:

Ty wrote:

Do not, for the love of god, use eloquence. While it can speak fast, you'll probably end up spelling loads of things wrong and thinking you spelled them right.

Agreed. I often can tell an Eloquence user who doesn't thoroughly proofread from the spelling mistakes they make. Eloquence users, be extra careful to check your spelling; Don't assume Eloquence will point out your errors, because it generally won't.

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2019-09-10 14:47:59

use eloquents

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2019-09-10 15:15:48

Use eloquence? did you just say, use, eloquence? for, writing? I'm sorry but, that's about the worst bit of advice. I use eloquence for everything, accept writing.

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2019-09-10 15:58:35

Using Eloquence is just fine, so long as you are using a text editor which will tell you if you have spelled something wrong or not. I use eloquence and don't make many of the mistakes I see other so called eloquence users making.

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2019-09-10 16:28:24

If a text editor that tells you if you've spelled something wrong exists, please let me know. i use notepad, and it doesn't. But a few examples of commen eloquence mistakes include utilities as utilaties, no one as noone, and others.

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2019-09-10 18:13:32

Notepad never had a spellchecker, but just about every other text editor I've seen does. You can use anything from Wordpad, to Open Office, to regular Office if you have it, to any of the myriad other Notepad lookalikes floating around. I honestly can't believe that I read that someone didn't know word processors usually have spellcheckers in 2019. Anyway, as for Eloquence, I don't see what's so bad about it either. I highly doubt that someone's ability to spell, or lack thereof, is predicated on the particular synth they use. I've been using Eloquence since the early 2000's, ever since I started using Windows and JAWS, and it didn't cause me to make more mistakes. It's true that writing, and spelling in particular, always came naturally to me, but still.

The glass is neither half empty nor half full. It's just holding half the amount it can potentially hold.

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