2021-02-25 01:33:35

No, Dark, unfortunately you're not correct on this point. I'm literally reading Pet Sematary at the moment. When the movers first come, Louis mentions them moving a double bed in. Early in the story, when Louis and Rachel fight, Louis comments that when he gets home, Rachel will undoubtedly be huddled on the far side of the bed (single, one bed) with Gage, leaving him feeling alone. By the time he has the dream about Victor Pascow, however, they are lying in adjoining twin beds. There is even mention, later on, after Rachel confesses about her sister, that Louis brings her into his bed when she wakes in the night.
So nope, he gaffed on this one, pure and simple. Doesn't ruin the book or anything, but definitely a gaff.

Also, I'm pretty sure the Creed family vehicle changes from a Fairlane to a Civic to a station wagon throughout the novel. I could probably pick out other inconsistencies if I tried.

It's still quite a good book though. It was your talking about it that made me want to reread it, in fact, since it's been awhile. Also makes me want to watch the 2019 film version, since I hear it has a wickedly dark ending.

Check out my Manamon text walkthrough at the following link:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/z8ls3rc3f4mkb … n.txt?dl=1

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2021-02-25 02:23:35

Ah fair enough Jade, I'd certainly noticed several inconsistencies myself while reading like the name of the owner of the bull I mentioned.
I'm composing a formal review at the moment so will knock a mark or two off for that, as King; or at least his editor should've done a better job there.

I read the synopses for the 2019 film, and the ending sounded totally bonkers, and very schlocky horror to me. Of course, reading a synopses and seeing something done are two different things, though in the case of a book like Pet Sematary, because so much of the horror comes not from what specifically happens, but from how it's told; heck even the mention of the title of the books' third part gave me chills, I don't know how well this one translates into other mediums, which I suppose is why they tried to compensate with a bit more in the 2019 film.

Even when my lady and I did the BBC audio drama last year , it was nasty, and well acted, and had a lot of seriously freaky sound design (especially in the swamp), but didn't have quite that absolutely visceral sense of impending doom and utter dark despair which the book has, and didn't give either of us the creeps the way the book did, for all it followed the book very closely.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

2021-02-25 02:51:06

The BBC version doesn't have enough time to really let that sense of doom drop over you. It's rushed, because it sort of has to be. Agreed, though, on the sound design and acting. Gage's scream when he goes into the road broke my heart when I heard it. Also, Timmy Baterman, sneering, "What do you think of that!" I was fourteen, remember. Also listening via headphones in a house that wasn't mine, after dark, when no one else was awake. Heh. I did it to myself.

Check out my Manamon text walkthrough at the following link:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/z8ls3rc3f4mkb … n.txt?dl=1

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2021-02-26 13:40:44 (edited by Dark 2021-02-26 13:43:37)

@Jayde, yep, it's odd, the Bbc version had great acting and sound design and the events all in the right order, and was probably as good as any adaptation could be, it just didn't have quite as much of the punch, which I suspect is due to just how much in Pet Sematary comes from the way it is told, rather than purely what happens (I'll never think of the title character of the Wizard of Oz quite the same way again).

On another note, Back in December I read Black house, the collaboration between King and Straub and sequel to the Talisman.
the webmaster of Fantasybookreview.co.uk has now put up my review which can be Found here,  ---- he's had a bit of a hiatus in posting lately, though hopefully this was just post Christmas blues and lockdown, and he and his family are all okay.

Sort of odd that my review of Blackhouse gets posted just as I'm completing one for another Stephen King novel, but so it goes, I do intend to read my way through King's  bibliography, or at least most of it, and bang out the odd review where I can, and where the site doesn't already have one, albeit I'll probably have a break from King for a while and do some stuff in different genres.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

2021-02-28 12:47:52

Black house is one of those novels I like a lot, and dislike a lot. For instance, I love the characterization for a ton of characters - Jack is good, Beezer is good, Judy is also good in a way - but then, I have serious trouble with Henry. He grates on my every nerve almost all of the time. Fifteen percent of the time, he's just a cool cat doing what cool cats do. The other eighty-five percent of the time, he's a blind man in the hands of two guys who don't know how to write blind men, and who don't want you to forget that Henry is indeed a cool cat. I don't know why, but Henry really, really gets up my nose. I also have the sense - as I did during both Doctor Sleep and The Institute - that there is no possible way the good guys will lose, even when awful things happen and setbacks occur. In the aforementioned books, it's worse, but for me it was still present here. Just enough mystical woo-woo to make the good guys come out on top. But there were some horrific setpieces, and Mr. Munshun was disgustingly creepy, among other things. I think I liked The Talisman just a bit better, but Black House is definitely better put together on a structural level. Pound for pound, you can tell that Straub and King in the 1980s just don't quite have the same chops as Straub and King in 2000 or so.

Check out my Manamon text walkthrough at the following link:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/z8ls3rc3f4mkb … n.txt?dl=1

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2021-02-28 13:43:26

I agree the talisman was generally a better book, but Blackhouse had it's good points, however oddly enough my lady and I both really liked henry liden.

Yeah, he's a blind radio dj with an awesome voice, however on the plus side, he is never helpless, was married, shows sartorial elegance and is (according to my lady),actually quite attractive in the way he's written. Yet for all of that, they don't do the dare devil thing of making him unrealistic, indeed I quite liked the way that outside of his perspective, people couldn't get a lot of the systems he used for remembering things like where his clothes were.

By contrast, I was less a fan of Jack here. he started off realy well when he was lonely and suffering a general mid life crisis and forgetting his childhood, however he quickly becomes a total succeedinator, ),  who is fantastic at everything, contemptuous of people like Fred Marshal and even tyler, and just rolled over the powers of darkness with simple ease, (the less said about his romance in this book the better).

We also felt that it was more due to the authors wanting Jack to be totally awesome, that things became waaaay too easy towards the end of the book (despite a really horrific death).

Btw, one interesting fact, when I was composing my review for Blackhouse, I ran across the article about the real Albert Fish on wikipedia, and yee gods! I never thought I'd say this, but this is one instance where King and Straub actually seemed      to hold back, since the real world Albert Fish makes the fictional charlse Burnside look pretty tame by comparison!

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

2021-03-06 15:37:17

This is probably mildly superfluous as I've already discussed my thoughts about Pet Sematary earlier in this topic, but now you can Go here for my review, which says most of the same things I did before, just in slightly better, or at least more reviewery language, which probably means not making up words like reviewery big_smile.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)