2019-07-11 01:08:50

Updates:

  • Added resources to various hello world primers

  • Marked each book either (nonfree), (free) or (maybe free).

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up +1

2019-07-11 03:07:45

One good book I read was called something like Artificial Intelligence Programming and was a host of articles covering many, many subjects. It was a very interesting read. If you can't find it, I'll look for it. Currently reading Conn Iguldens Rise of an Empire though smile

No, I did not leave the forum for good. Sorry to disappoint.
Come beat me up on xbox if you need to take out your frustrations, LordLundin96

Thumbs up

2019-07-11 22:29:18

This is great!
I think you should add a list of text editors and IDES that are easy to use with a screen reader, such as visual studio, EdSharp, Notepad++...
Also, Java and JavaScript should not be in the same section, they are not the same thing at all.
There should be a heading for Web development that has JavaScript and maybe Node (although node is not strictly for web development).
A fantastic JavaScript tutorial is Free Code Camp.
Also, Learn Python the Hard Way is a very good tutorial.

Thumbs up

2019-07-11 22:41:48

@28, I didn't mean to imply that Java and JavaScript are the same thing; I just grouped them together to make the organization less cluttered (IMO). I should probably rename that to "JVM-based languages and JavaScript" since it doesn't cover only Java, but other Java-based languages that run on the JVM.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up

2019-07-12 04:53:20

good job, Ethin! I really, really love this list! can you add that Javatpoint tutorials link for C, C++, Python as well? oh also how about adding    a list of tutorials like discrete structures, data science, algorithms and computing, artificial intelligence, machine learning(for beginners, not language specific),  etc in that other books section?  this thread is going to help the potential developers and programmers; why not make it a convenient resource for the computer science/information technology students as well? the most amazing thing I saw when I opened dev room, you made my  day man! hats off! big_smile
oh also I got this. maybe it'll enhance the list even more. https://www.dropbox.com/s/b1kh4m9dg8b0h … s.rar?dl=1

When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.-Clark's first law.
Find me on Twitter

Thumbs up

2019-07-12 06:29:24

I'll check it out and add those tutorials if I can find them! (Perhaps I'll scrounge up some more C/C++ stuff too.)

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up

2019-07-12 07:02:11 (edited by Ethin 2019-07-12 07:07:13)

Update: added some more programming languages and appropriate books; added some other books and extra resources (I especially like the last book in the "other books" section).
If you guys want me to add my pentesting books, then just say so. But as I said, I'm hesitant knowing that kids who don't really know what their doing will pick up those books and cause harm with them. Its probably an unfounded fear but I hope you guys understand.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up

2019-07-12 16:41:30

I would be interested, but I understand your concern as well.  Those areas require a hell of an ethic.

Coding is not hard. No, not at all.
What is hard is making code that accepts different and sometimes unexpected types of input and still works.
This is what truly takes a large amount of effort on a developer's part.

Thumbs up

2019-07-12 18:30:48

Sorry for the double post.
32,  again, I have not dealt with those areas much, but don’t you need to know what you are doing in order to make any kind of headway?  Do your books provide any code that can actually work?  As in, a script that can break something open? Or do they focus on the theory and allow you to build your own tools. If it’s the first one, I wouldn’t list the resources, simply due to people copying the code and using it for malicious purposes.  If it’s a balance between the two and or the second option, I would not worry about it.  Most people that you are concerned about do not even understand how the code really works, and example of that would be the recent TK.

Coding is not hard. No, not at all.
What is hard is making code that accepts different and sometimes unexpected types of input and still works.
This is what truly takes a large amount of effort on a developer's part.

Thumbs up

2019-07-12 18:44:46

@34, its a balance, really. Some teach how to use tools (i.e. metasploit), which is why I'm hesitant, because Metasploit offers exploitation tools out of the box.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up

2019-07-12 20:35:05 (edited by kaigoku 2019-07-12 20:38:10)

Hi. This post is much appreciated. Although I am already a professional developer and all that business, I know some of these resources may be of great use to some people. That being said, and please try not to take offense to this, but how many of these books listed have actually been read? I'm not expecting for one single person to have sat down and read all these books. And I also realize it is the responsibility of beginners to try to evaluate resources for its pedagogical styles and whether or not it might work for them. However, it may also be somewhat overwhelming for new programmers to sift through so many formal resources, only to be discouraged. Maybe, just maybe, someone could consider adding a section for recommended paths to take for learning essentials that would be particular to audiogame development, as it is appropriate for this community. Again, I'm really not trying to discredit the efforts being made here. It is truly appreciated. However, someone can just as easily google a list of top programming books and compile a list similar to this. At the end of the day, I guess curiosity also has to exist to even make it far on this journey of being a developer (even a beginner developer). A good subredit I would recommend is r/learnprogramming. There are good discussions on Computer Science topics, programming languages, resource discussions, etc.

Click here to friend me on Facebook.
Click here to follow me on twitter.
If you want to add me to Skype, my name is lozano.edgar.
Please let me know that your from the AudioGames community if you wish to add me on any of these sites.

2019-07-12 20:41:10 (edited by Ethin 2019-07-12 20:41:55)

@36, I have most of them, except a few, and take snippets from them every here and there.
Unfortunately there are no books in existence on audio game development explicitly, but I do have a few on Game Development with Unreal and SDL. Unreal is inaccessible, however, and the book on SDL is in C/C++. The amount of books listed here already though for C, C++, Python and so on is enough to give someone the knowledge to create an audio game without a book to hold their hand.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up

2019-07-12 21:04:20

@37, I understand what you're saying. I wasn't suggesting a book on the subject of AudioGame development. It's obvious that such a book does not exist yet. Although, that wouldn't be a bad idea. I was merely suggesting a path listing out some resources (possibly in the order that they should be read) to get to the point of being able to develop an AudioGame. Also, in this recommended path, ideally, there would be a variety of subpaths (which programming language, libraries, etc that could be used for audiogame development). Or if a person isn't looking to develop audiogames, just give some recommendations as to what books/resources could be considered useful from the perspective of a screen reader user, etc. Maybe even start doing book/resource reviews. lol I know there is only so much we can do to simplify the learning process, but I think it's something worth thinking about. Also, possessing a book and actually reading it to get some value out of it are two different things. I have a huge collection of books too. But I've only read like 10 out of a possible 100. And mostly, it was just to search for specific type of information. I wish I had more time to help out with a lot of this! I've always had a curiosity for pedagogical approaches to learning about computer science, electronics, programming, etc. But maybe that's a different conversation altogether.

Click here to friend me on Facebook.
Click here to follow me on twitter.
If you want to add me to Skype, my name is lozano.edgar.
Please let me know that your from the AudioGames community if you wish to add me on any of these sites.

2019-07-12 23:07:12 (edited by Ethin 2019-07-12 23:07:32)

@38, very true. I certainly haven't read all of my books -- I couldn't possibly -- but I'll consider listing my game devleopment books. (There's already one up thre, for LibGDX development, but they use Java, and LibGDX isn't accessible with NVDA, so...) I can post my SDL game development book though. While it uses graphics, which I encourage any person wanting to develop a game to learn, it will give you the knowledge needed to develop a game using LibSDL2. You also have the OpenGL books I listed in the other books section.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up

2019-07-13 14:15:16

@Ethin:

I would like to thank you for compiling such a massive source of programming books and other resources for beginners like myself.

Also, I was quite happy to see two of the c books I own, (C primer+, and c programming: a modern approach.) in the book list.

But I would like to recommend another book:

c programming: absolute beginner's guide, third edition.

For now, I am reading through this book. once I complete this one, I will go to the primer, if that proved to be too advance still, then I will start to read the book of K.N. King, then go back to the primer again.

As the name suggests, it is book for the complete beginners, who do not have any knowledge of c. from personal experience, I think the book could have done with some exercises though.

You also wrote about learning graphics, would you mind elaborating on that? as a complete blind programmer with a zero vision, what exactly could I get out of learning graphics, can I even learn those?

Anyway, keep up the good work!

Thumbs up

2019-07-13 20:27:48

@40, I'll add that one.
About the graphics: I believe that, if your going to make a game, you should know graphics programming. You may be blind, but I am of the opinion that since the Sited are making their games accessible for us (re: Mindcraft, Madden, ...) we should reciprocate by at least attempting to make our games playable by sited individuals. In other words, we need to meet them half-way. It may seem fruitless, we may not be able to do it right, but at least we can say we tried, which is far better than saying, "Well, we're blind, its not possible for us to make good graphics". We may be blind, yes; but we have all these sited individuals (and even graphics developers) who would love to help us with that, I imagine. You have sited people would be happy to give you feedback on how good your graphics are and ideas on ways of improving them; perhaps you may even find sited people who have written games with graphics to help you with the code. But it certainly is possible to do.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up

2019-07-13 21:21:46

Wow, thanks for this long list.
Would you want to add a little section that lists good tools for audio games in Python, pygame, sound_lib, Tolk, that sort of thing?

My tactical battle scripts: https://www.dropbox.com/s/dzsmqv2pgqvu1 … h.zip?dl=1
Currently, one of my favorite games is Trimps.
So I'm the Trimper Trooper!

Thumbs up +1

2019-07-18 21:35:04

I hope this hasn't stalled, we've only done the first part after all, though of course that work is very appreciated.  But we've still got libraries and IDES to talk about for instance...
Has anyone thought about linking to Darter's tutorials?

Buy the worlds greatest machine gun. It's about 50 inches in length, It's huge! & it can shoot really far, &, it's cheap!
Lets demonstrate this: stand still Thom...
Okay ma.aaa!
Oh! crap!

Thumbs up

Yesterday 21:49:35

I assure you, this topic hasn't died at all. smile I'm still here. Really need to find some way of making this editable (Oh how I wish we could do community wikis like what Stack Overflow does...)

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up

Yesterday 23:15:49

Ah okay good to here.
It seems like allot of these books don't have much to do with audio games development, maybe the scope is too wide?  Overwhelming people with choices wouldn't be good.  You could always break it into sections and explain what each section is good for in audio gaming...

Buy the worlds greatest machine gun. It's about 50 inches in length, It's huge! & it can shoot really far, &, it's cheap!
Lets demonstrate this: stand still Thom...
Okay ma.aaa!
Oh! crap!

Thumbs up

Today 02:09:36

@45, Most of them are just programming languages. This list wasn't necessarily intended for books describing audio game development in particular but just a general resource available on the forum.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up