2018-09-12 12:52:54

Greetings. Short and sweet, i just want to ask you guys a question. I was going to know weather visually impaired people can work with  electronic or not. Not only the theories, but also manage to work with board and cir-kits and making electronic stuff. It sounds really interesting to me, i always wanted to build up electronic things from scratch and designing them. But since i herd there are things like soldering and other stuff that require sight, it all sounded too far out of reach. So has anybody ever tried or trying to work around with it?
Best Regards

You crushed my soul under your powerful fangs in cold blood. You torn it up, bit into it, slapped it too hard till it came apart, with each piece flying in every direction. You get to be happy now! or maybe, there's a little bit of humanity left in you?

Thumbs up

2018-09-12 15:42:52

Hi, I know that there are blind people that work with electronics. There is a project happening at the San Francisco LightHouse for the blind and the link to that can be found here:
http://blarbl.blogspot.com/
This is also a useful resource:
http://www.ski.org/smith-kettlewell-technical-file
hth

Thumbs up +1

2018-09-12 21:35:25 (edited by magurp244 2018-09-12 21:45:47)

Soldering for the visually impaired as Haylee has helped illustrate, is very much a thing and is quite possible. There are however many ways to work with electronics that don't strictly require soldering, like using breadboards, jumpers or jump wires, press fit header pins, conductive tape or epoxy, etc. A good place to get a start with this sort of thing could be with a [Raspberry Pi] or Arduino unit, they have a bunch of resources and guides to play around with for both hardware and software applications.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

Thumbs up

2018-09-13 01:00:08

Hi,

After getting a Computer Science degree, I decided I wanted to go further and am now getting a degree in Electrical Engineering. This is to say that I've been getting along quite well in my courses, which consists mostly of theoretical and mathematical concepts. In terms of hands-on activities, I participate by familiarizing myself with components, determining values of resistors or what I may be using, and I sketch circuits on a board from APH to aid me in visualizing wire configuration, etc. For hobby electronics, I would also recommend playing around with Raspberry Pi or Arduino boards. There was a blog where some blind engineers were describing how to use Arduino tools with a screen reader. I think it's still around. EE is very fun once you have the basics down. I even made my own talking tools out of Raspberry Pi for measuring voltage, etc. A digital multimeter of sorts.

Click here to friend me on Facebook.
Click here to follow me on twitter.
If you want to add me to Skype, my name is lozano.edgar.
Please let me know that your from the AudioGames community if you wish to add me on any of these sites.

2018-09-13 12:39:41

thanks all smile.
Regards.

You crushed my soul under your powerful fangs in cold blood. You torn it up, bit into it, slapped it too hard till it came apart, with each piece flying in every direction. You get to be happy now! or maybe, there's a little bit of humanity left in you?

Thumbs up