1

So, I was wondering if anyone had a windows install image that uses NVDA on the installer, and also keeps NVDA after windows is done. The problem with Bryan Smart's installers are that NVDA is not kept when installation is done. I would like to have one that does.

Thumbs up

2

Unfortunately, I don't think there are any. Plus, they'd prefer that you go through their process of entering your email first. I'm not sure why, but it's probably for a good reason.

If anyone wants to add me on Skype, it's garrett.brown2014.

Thumbs up

3

It's a user-base thing and also so that they personally can send you updates, although to be completely honest I haven't really gotten any from them except for my donation messages. Either way, slipstreaming only goes as far as device drivers, I believe.

I'm the only adventure at c: master hahahaha I have unlocked just about everything!

Thumbs up

4

After a clean install of Windows, you can run Narrator to get you through the setup screen, and then install NVDA immediately. If you're using Windows 10, this is a pretty easy process. Earlier versions of Windows, particularly 7, are a bit more difficult since Narrator was crap then, but it is doable if you're determined.

The glass is neither half empty nor half full. It's just holding half the amount it can potentially hold.

Thumbs up

5

You can also use a USB drive or other removable media. Put the NVDA setup executable and an autorun.inf file on the drive. The executable will run automatically according to autorun.inf.

Thumbs up

6

It doesn't, never has for me, but its easily startable from the run dialog. Also, if you don't have a copy, just use ninite, they carry a copy and its easy to install a lot of apps really quickly that way, they have this accessibility page which contains NVDA and apps known to work well with screen readers. It's perfectly doable to check a bunch of options using narrator, then download and run the ninite installer, which will in turn install all those apps.

The bipeds think this place belongs to them, how cute.

Thumbs up

7

Negative: it might not be that easy to run it from the Run dialog. Removable media is never guaranteed to be assigned consistent drive letters, especially on a fresh copy of Windows.

Thumbs up

8

installing NvDA is super easy! just go to
www.ninite.com

find the NV-Access checkbox and check it. then hit the make your ninite installer or get ninite button. and while you're at it use ninite to get other stuff you need or may want quickly and easily. When your ninite installer has been downloaded, run it. your ninite installer will happily go out onto the internet and grab all the latest versions of the software you requested for your custom ninite accessible installer. and yes it will install NVDA for you, no prompts, no nothing, just sit back and watch your installer from www.ninite.com work its magic!

Thumbs up

9

No, removable media aren't very easy, but doable. You can just hit windows r and type D:\nvda\nvda.exe, hit enter, wait 10 seconds, hit escape a few times, then go with E:, until you get a result. As for ninnite, I recommend you don't use it too much. THe last time I did, it installed 32 bit versions of important apps such as firefox on my 64 bit system, which is less secure. And yes, it should be possible to integrate nvda into a windows image. But narrator works fine for the initial setup, but you'll have to use tools ment for computer manufacturers which are not very accessible and not intuitive. I suggest you put nvda on removable media, and use the trick I outlined above to start it.

Roel
golfing in the kitchen

Thumbs up

10

As long as an app is a new version running under 32bit is no big deal whatsoever. The only difference for 32bit vs 64bit is memory allocation allowed.

I'm the only adventure at c: master hahahaha I have unlocked just about everything!

Thumbs up

11

While I do like Ninite myself, I also have a thing about offline installers. I must be the only weird person who actually enjoys sitting down and installing all the programs I need by hand, lol. There's just something soothing about it. I know a couple of people who despise building their systems up from the ground, software wise, that way, but I love it. If I'm in a hurry, I'll use Ninite, and I have a task set to run biweekly which runs an installer with all of the essential programs that should be kept up to date such as Java, Shockwave, Skype, etc. Also, it goes without saying, but offline installers are much better in situations where you have a data cap, or no internet connection for whatever reason.

The glass is neither half empty nor half full. It's just holding half the amount it can potentially hold.

Thumbs up

12

eww... The thought of installing all of my apps, I mean I've done it countless times, been installing systems since windows 3.1.1. Ninite automates this grim prospect rather nicely, and its fast. I know there are people who enjoy things like filing and paper work, and mundane things, but I'm like 180° off from that, I hate that kind of thing with a passion. I will automate whatever I can because I hate drudgery.

The bipeds think this place belongs to them, how cute.

Thumbs up

13

Haha, I totally get that. I think it's something about having complete control over the process which appeals to me.

The glass is neither half empty nor half full. It's just holding half the amount it can potentially hold.

Thumbs up

14

You can not only slipstream drivers into a Windows install but updates, especially service packs, too.

Thumbs up

15

hot key command for turning narrator on and off?

Thumbs up

16

control windows enter

The bipeds think this place belongs to them, how cute.

Thumbs up

17

And windows enter for older versions of windows. And yes, for most programs it doesn't matter if they are 32 or 64 bits, but for some reason browsers are an exception. THe following post from the firefox blog skims over the benefits:
https://blog.mozilla.org/firefox/firefo … t-windows/
It's rather short, but I reason that sometime someone has thought about this, someone with more knowledge then I have on this subject. And it sorta makes sense that a browser will use more than 2 gb when many tabs are opened.

Roel
golfing in the kitchen

Thumbs up

18

@ post11, i'm in agreement with you.
I also prefer to have all the offline installers.
my reasons is a few fold.
first. I hate crap ware. I hate them.
I get all mest up inside when i think of all that needless junk. after working with peoples pcs for years. I crindge to think of what I found in there.

secondly, space, since I run on a small SSD i'd love my space.
the fact that windows takes any ware from fifteen GB to 20 GB, annoys  me to know end. yes, sure there's some dll's it needs, yes sure it has some protected files tucked away for rainy days. but in know dam way must a modern OS use up this much space. I get it, hardrives has  plenty space these days.
but it feels to me programmers of windows has gotten lazy.
windows can function very well on just 8 gigs of space. I saw this, I experienced this. hell. its dooable.
but 15? 20? gigs, but so we go.

so, now, due to lovely Southafrica, and data being high priced, I hate online installers even more. so, mission offline installer, here we go.
here's a nice old example.
i've been using windows live mail 2011, the version without the ribbins, for years.
it just works. well. if i'd leave it to its own devices, it would install over 2 or 300 megs of crap ware i do not need.
so? hello offline installer,
take it one step further,
and if mails the only part you need? just untick all the boxes and you end up with fifty 2 megs of. huh? mail? choice gard, error reporting, upload tool? all that just to install the maill ap? no no no. lets do something about this.
just extract the .MSI files, then work out what dependencies  it uses, wich is nicely built in to the package?
so lets see, it needs its little SQL installer, okay got that for it.
on older versions of windows it needs dot net 2.0.
but fortunately for us,
the newer versions of windows,  does not have this requirement, so skip that hefty file there.
ah, skip the upload tool. skip the sign in assistant,  skip choice gard.
ah so nice and cute, we now have. your self a nice little sweet beautiful 40 meg install.
ah the nice part of life.
now. good old dot net frame work. leave it up to windows? and you'll have gigs of space wasted on all the dam version of dot net you don't need. so?
again, lets see wich apps requires wich version of dot net. then, in sted of installing them all, just install the ones you know your apps will need.
nice nice.
i once, had a beautiful instelation ware windows only took up 8 gigs.
ah the joys. but sadly i had to apply security updates. and windows quickly munched up all my gigs. and settled back down to fifteen.
so their we go.
the short version, offline installers, is a nice nice thing to have. and if you happen to have some update role up patches, wich is also offline, hay you good to go.
saving you band with, data costs, and time.

I must be honest with NVDA I take the short cut. if i am managing a system, and do a clean install, I usually give the installer a unique name, then I also create a portable version of NVDA, and since I use custome setups.
i actually, once the language selection screen comes up in setup. instead of using narrator. I do a quick shift F10 wich brings up the command prompt window, then, I type to ware the portable NVDA resides,
then i breze   through the setup. and just before the last setup screen, i quit NVDA and then hit next.
you may wonder why I just don't let NVDA run, well, I actually ran in to issues when testing this out and i had this more then once.
it seems windows does not like portable apps running while its finishing setup. smile.
so try that at your own risk, do not let NVDA continue to run when windows finishes setup. else it will behave weardly. and i've not found a fix for that. but you can certainly run it in portable mode, while setting up windows. provided that audio drivers or USB audio is ready for use.

There's a place for me in this universe. and our journey continues on, together

Thumbs up