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Hi guys! I'm trying to understand the Fridrich Method but, for me, it just isn't clear at all! Are there other methods we could use a part from the Layer Method? There aren't many explanations for us, in internet; at least there aren't well described guides. Any suggestions? Thanks a lot

Claudio

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a very good question, i would be curious too. but i am afraid, many methods are built up on the Fridrich one, as its the most widely used by the speed cubers.

f.a.t.h.e.r

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Ok, so, trying to figure out how to apply the Fridrich method, where could I read a good guide or listen to a good youtube video for this method?
An other idea: we could do a sort of tournament, just for fun, to see who is the blindchampion. But how could we do that?

Claudio

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I couldn't get the Fridrich method to work. I got the feeling it's quick for people who can see, but maybe not for those who cant. I was able to work out a way to put the corner and center edge pieces in at the same time, but it took a lot of messing and thinking, which slowed everything down. I wasn't able to follow the instructions that taught you the basic concepts for that manoeuvre because they were based around diagrams. I still found the layer by layer method described on the RNIB doc was quickest for me. There was an alternative method for doing the bottom layer that involved thinking rather than just memorizing moves, and I preferred that because it was more enjoyable, but any time you have to think it definitely slows things down.

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I never heard about these sounds cool!

Kingdom of Loathing name JB77

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flackers has a point there. sadly the Fridrich is heavily used with tables, diagrams, and similar things. it has many-many cases, and algorithms to learn. for the f2l, its about 41, for the oll about 57, and for the pll about 21 or something like this. i have found good documents, but when you cant imagine what to do, then, its Quite hard. so staying with the lbl, yet.

f.a.t.h.e.r

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