101

My lady reads a lot of  true crime  Guitarman and one of the most shocking books she read was about Ian Brady's next door neighbor, indeed I think it was called something like "the monster next door" or similar.
She new both him and Mira hindley, who were two truly nasty psychopaths (actually King mentioned them in a good marriage), who carried out some horrible murders on the yorkshire mores in the 1970's, ---- Brady recently died.
It was very much like that apparently, Brady was quite a nice guy, or at least he had the facade of being such, which is what made the story interesting, my problem was more with the affect of the story given that it never really seemed Darsy was that fond of Bob even before she knew he was a psycho big_smile.

I have Rose madder, Dream catcher and the girl who loved Tom gordon on my victor, though I am also tempted to stick four past midnight on there too, then again I'll probably give King a rest for a while.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

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102

Okay my lady and I just finished Joyland.
I do hope to do a full review for the book, but in brief I did enjoy it.
It's ironic that King, master of horror could do a fairly simple coming of age story around an amusement park and yet make it so compelling.
I didn't see the similarities to doctor sleep mentioned earlier in this topic accept for the word "roobs" since for a start, the carnival people in Joyland had very different names and are in general a much different crowd, especially with how Joyland is  amusement park.

I especially applaud the fact King managed to make a story featuring a dying little boy and not need to reach for the treacle once, indeed I have noticed that King has improved at writing decent characters and stuff that is actually emotionally affecting without being cloying or trite.
Beware! spoilage ahoy! read no further lest yee want Joyland to become spoiland big_smile.

On the down side, I do wish he'd actually done a bit more with Linda Grey's ghost. She was a major element in the plot with lots of build up. I expected her to be involved in the plot to find the psycho murderer, and yet she mmmm, just left because she was visited by a psychic boy.

Talk about wasted potential. On the other hand, the  ghost in the book of Eddy parks was well done indeed, he was an unpleasant old cuss, but he was at least an honourable unpleasant old cuss even as a ghost, I also thought the resolution with Anny and the gun was very well put together, as was their cover story for the police, though I do wish King had  tried a bit less to obfuscate the killer.

When it's down to only one of two people and he uses the phrase "rhyming patter" to describe the person, there is only one character in the book who speaks like that so it's fairly obvious, so all of king's "the killer was standing there" type of artificial authorial obfuscation was a little annoying.

I also liked the fact that the romance in this one had some actual emotional content behind it even if it was by necessity a brief encounter, indeed I can't think of too many examples where brief encounters work this well on an emotional level.
That being said, Anny's change from dramatically hostile to weeping and suddenly nice was a bit too clean.

I can see that suddenly realizing your being selfish with the limited time your dying son has left would be a pretty major emotional shock, but to have Anny almost change personality (as well as have Devin instantly change from scared boy to competent male comforter), was a little jarring.

Still it's hard to write emotional changes in a book of this length, and in fairness to King their relationship did actually work.

My only last negative cryticism is erin. For goodness sake, can King possibly write a male/female friendship that doesn't! involve snogging?

This felt especially out since Erin was with Devin's best friend at the time.
I don't know if King subscribes to the When harry met Sally principle, that straight men and women can't be friends without! some sort of attraction  (and that was a terrible, horrible bloody annoying film anyway), but either way as someone who is male, straight and! has number of female friends outnumbers their male friends, this sort of character blind spot is rather irritating.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

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103

Well I just finished The stand and have even banged out a review for fantasybookrefview.co.uk.

In general i really enjoyed it. It is one of the books where King's style impressed me, albeit I thought the politics got a bit draggy and directionless, ---- something King admited himself.
Still even with all the apocalypse stuff now the stand still, ---- wel stands out.

My only major issue was basically King wasn't great at female characters, indeed my lady acuses him (especially with characters like Franny), of writing women as what she referd to as "wet tissues" and really in the Stand the fact that the majority of tthe female cast basically sit around, cry have babies and get hysterical didn't help.

~Actually Fran sort of annoyed me with how childish she was.

Beware! spoiling spoilers!


i really liked Larry and his issues with Lucy, particularly because Lucy was just nice and so the potential Larry/nadine/lucy traingle was an interesting one, indeed it is sort of amusing that Nadine is probably the most three dimensional female character in the book.

That being said I hated the fact that basically you don't see anything of Lucy after Larry has got himself blown up and the implication is that she's happy because she's had babies, because all women want babies!

Anyway I've talked about that in my review so methinks I'll stop.

In general though there was so much good stuff here. Flagg is just awesome, indeed I could've stood a bit more of him, and I love how complicated trashcan man was.

People cryticise the hole dreams/hand of god thing, though to me that was okay since it worked in context of what was going on, indeed I find it interesting that one of King's inspirations was George Stewart's novel Earth abides which is also about a virus wiping out the world's population, since that book had such cardboard characters and is so blatantly moralistic and so bloody dated in its stereotypes from ratial to gender it was actively painful to read, so many points to king for sorting things out.

I did find the hole evil government thing a bit odd, ---- then again these days it would've been the evil companies, which I suppose now pretty much mean the same thing (especially in America).
either way, very awesome, and still! lots of fun, and a crying shame king had to cut a chunk from the first edition, though thankfully both times I read the stand it was the longer version.

I'll post up a link to my review when its up.

Actually that's three king books I've reviewed now, Under the dome, Joyland and The stand (I meant to do cell after I read it last year but never got around to it and no, I don't review short story collections).

Hmmm, methinks Rose madder or maybe needful things next, neither of which I've read before, actually I'm tempted to do Rose Madder as it's one of my lady's favourites, though I'll probably give King a bit of a rest for a while.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

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104

I loved the stand!
I will have to take a look at George Stewart just because - though a lot of my favorite king books are his older ones.
Christine, firestarter, night shift are a few of my absolute favorites.
I'd really be curious if it would be worth it finding the older version of the stand to see exactly what got cut out or added to.

-wolfy
Barks at everyone, wags tail
great videogame music websites: http://www.vgmusic.com and http://gh.ffshrine.org/soundtracks.php?r=533

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105

I would not recommend George Stewart's novel, its considered a classic but really I was majorly disappointed.
My lady has read the cut version of the stand, but what she tells me actually sounds as if the story is less coherent, for example the  scene where  Tom saves knick from the tornado  is completely missing, which my lady really didn't like since its one of the moments you realize Tom is actually more able than he seems.

A;Also group of women that Stu and co rescue from the bunch of thugs including Shurley and Daina basically they just run into randomly, and so Shurley's mental illness is never explained. Likewise, the hole relationship with Fran's mother doesn't come into the book which did at least go some way to explaining her character (irritating though I did find her).

and if I could ever find a substantive list of differences kicking around on the net somewhere i'd be interested to read it, but I enjoyed the Stand too much to want to read an inferior version just for the sake of curiosity, rather the same way I only ever saw the original theatrical cut of the Lotr films at the cinemar for the first time and ever since I've always watched the directors cut versions.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

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106

To anyone who fancies reading it you can Go here to read my review of the Stand

and here to read my review of Joyland since I don't think I stuck the link in this topic before.

that is three King book's I've reviewed formally now counting under the dome, though in fairness I also forgot to do reviews for cell and the green mile so they're not a series or anything big_smile.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

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107

Well since mrs. Dark and I just finished Rose madder yesterday it was time for some threadcromancy.

It's interesting that people are so polarised on this one, Grady hendrics in the above mentioned reread didn't like it at all (then again he doesn't seem to like much king), and apparently King himself didn't think it was his best book.
On the other hand apparently people have told King it was the impetus that made them quit abusive relationships, and there is This review blog which I really liked, both because the lady obviously knows what's she's talking about and because of how she relates it to her own experience.

I did enjoy the book, i thought Rose and her reactions were frighteningly realistic, and I liked the fact that king gave such a nuanced portrait of someone coming out of an abusive relationship. 
My only miner issues were firstly that Norman went waaaaay over board into evil stakes. Some things, like his instilling his wife with a fear of cops and his mopping up his wife's blood whilst casually easting a sandwich were frighteningly, and disturbingly believable, as were the details of Ros's fear of him, other things though, like the fact that  pretty much hated everyone, jews, black people, women, gay people, disabled people! he was casual about murder and torture and such, indeed he was pretty much nuts even before reality started to go.

It was all a bit too! over the top for my liking, which is a shame, since had Norman just been a more extended version of Tom Rogan from it he probably would've worked far more.

The fantasy elements for me in this one, while very nicely done also could've done with a bit of explanation.

Beware! spoilers ahoy!

While I'm quite okay with random immortal goddess woman, how the hell she had a child which wound up in the maze with the mad bull? also, at the end, why exactly she couldnt' just be hanging about inside the picture to deal with norman, but left Rose to taunt him through the temple for, ----- mmmmm reasons.

I don't mind my fantasy elements working because of prophecy or ka or something else, but the fact that here basically the climax could have happened anywhere in the fantasy world and got extended just because felt a bit too contrived to me. Had king actually said why, or given an indication, or had some sort of fantasy logic to it i'd have accepted it, but sadly King didn't give us that.

I was a also a bit sorry that the ties to the Dark tower weren't more specific, as we sadly don't see this semi immortal goddess and her child ever again, which was rather random.

On the other hand, yee gods King doing griek  was very cool indeed! and i'm always up for a fantasy quest story, especially one which fetures someone very much out of her depth who continues on anyway.

So definitely a good book all around. One of my favourite king books? I don't know, but certainly one I liked, and one which actually seems  attract far more harsh criticism than it deserves.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

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