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I have an old computer on which I now installed linux.
It was all frozen anyway.
How do I install the WI-FI drivers that come with my USB adapter.
This is because I am running a very old computer that does not actually have a wi-fi card.
I am running Vinux.

here is the adapter I am using
https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+ … -8&oe=

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I'm not even going to get on you why you *** shouldn't *** use Vinux. Oh well. Anyway, most modern Linux systems have kernel modules already built-in. It should work automatically, and if it doesn't, tr modprobe <module>. I'm not sure what that wi-fi card refers to for a module name.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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I actually would like it if you went on about why I should or should not use this distribution of Linux. I’m very new.   I’m trying to install the driver. I run the script that is given to automatically install. I don’t know if it worked. Where do you go to turn on and off the Wi-Fi on and look Xbox running  MATE  Desktop. Thank you for your help.

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Uh... now I'm confused. If the script you ran to install the driver didn't complain -- as in, print any errors or warnings -- then it should work automatically on next reboot. I don't get why you put Xbox in there... [confused]. As for why you shouldn't use Vinux, well, for one, the distribution hasn't been updated in years, and for two, if you do update it yourself, it absolutely and totally breaks everything. So not only are you stuck with out-of-date software, your stuck with an old version of Ubuntu which should've been updated to 17.04/17.10 by now. But it seems as if the Vinux devs could care less...
If your new to Linux, I'd recommend either Ubuntu or Debian. Both are good, both are stable. I'd recommend Arch Linux, but that's for those who enjoy full flexibility of how their system is built. (Of course, if you really enjoy digging into the super technical aspect of how this and that works and how you can change this and that, use Gentoo... if you enjoy really, really long install times... and also enjoy a hell of a lot of risk...)

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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Sorry for the confusion. I meant to say where do you go on a Linux computer to start Wi-Fi. I am running the MATE  Desktop. I can also run unity or  Gnome

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