1

Hi.
Well I've been using python for a while which I am enjoying. I tried using pyaudiogame, but the last time it was updated was two years ago and I couldn't get it to work anyway. I decided to take a look at bgt. I understand basic coding concepts like if statements, variables, and things like that. I think I could make the switch to bgt pretty easily, I'm just wondering is it worth it? I like the idea of using something that is made specifically to make audiogames. I know bgt is no longer updated, so I'm just a little hesitant to start using it. I know this will get a lot of different answers, but I like hearing different opinions, it helps me think.
Thanks.

Guitarman.
Playing music and coding, are kinds of real world magic.

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2

BGT is comparable to Python in terms of ease of building (easier, what with the lack of dependencies and the native .exe compiling). Javascript ... was in the same general boat as BGT, if weaker on audio, but it has mutated and browsers have mutated and the debug information is more of a pain to find and you need servers for everything and GAH!
So yeah, I like BGT because the less I have to download, install, setup, and type lang.package.resource_manager.get_resource().setup_other_resource(), the better.
But if you can make do with Python, your options expand greatly. BGT can be used for many things, but when you get down to it, it's the sort of toolkit you use if you want to make audio games, and just audio games. So I suppose the question is how much you're willing to put up with dependency scavenger hunts, and if you want to do more than just audio games.

Some of my games
Keep up to date by following @Jeqofire on twitter!
Ear Ninja?

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3

I also recomend bgt, for you. I also find python a little more like a thing in which you need to hunt for packages.
But the reason is, because btgt is made for audiogames only, and python is made for software, games and so on.

best regards
never give up on what ever you are doing.

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4

I'd go for C++. Sure, you've got to do dependency hunting -- but you've got to do that no matter what, it being inevitable and all that. And you get the most power with C++.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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5

sorry if i ask, but did you never try the audiogame-kit? lol i'm just curious to know  if some one used it.

...

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6

Hi Ethin.
I sent you a pm.

Guitarman.
Playing music and coding, are kinds of real world magic.

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7

[ a-t ] post 5, i first need some soort of insperation to start working with audio-game-kit
I don't know why, but yeh.

best regards
never give up on what ever you are doing.

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8

@Guitarman, I replied to your PM.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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9

there no documentation for it
and its no longer supported

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10

@wiam-s, what's no longer supported?

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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11

Hi.
@Post 9 what are you talking about? I assume your talkingabout pyaudiogame or agk? I think both are outdated or no longer supported. You have got to be more specific when you post something like that.

Guitarman.
Playing music and coding, are kinds of real world magic.

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12

Agree with 11.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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13

BGT is great to start with if what you want to do is quickly create a game. BGT however will severely limit you when it comes to important things like 3d audio, cross platform support ETC. You also will not be making much of anything else in BGT besides games. To be fair, I used it at my old job if I quickly needed to create a script to handle a particular use case.
I have really been trying to find an engine I can use which will quickly allow me to not only create games, but then compile across multiple platforms.
A lot of people enjoy python. I do not. I have really wanted to get in to something like unity, but that brings up so many accessibility issues I don't even know where to start.
I am constantly asked to bring Super Egg Hunt, and other games to multiple platforms. IOS and Mac being two major ones.
You will have to decide what it is you want to do, and then go from there.

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14 (edited by CAE_Jones 2017-11-07 12:02:11)

Dangit, now I'm going to spend the rest of the week trying to build such a thing, update last year's crappy 3d editor at best, then get beat up by ADHD until I ultimately drown my self-disappointment in reading useless things on the internet. Thanks a lot, great-idea-haver! tongue
Blindness? Pfft, executive disfunction is what screws me over. And by extention everyone else, if my narcissistic tendencies are to be believed (don't listen to them!).
Well, that was useless, self-centered, and needlessly snarky. Is it 2003 and the past 14.5 years have been a very disturbing dream? Eh, I'll leave it, so 2003-me gets something other than contempt for being *points up* that.

But no seriously why don't we have something like a powerpoint for game development? I use powerpoint as the example because it's accessible, we can use it to create images out of autoshapes, and they can in no way compare to sighted artists but it's much better than nothing. Surely I'm not the only one who's thought "yeah, do that, but for games"? Or was that Unity and since it's not a Microsoft product no one cares?
OK, how much will it take to get such a project started? I mean, literally take the Powerpoint 2000 help file, and use that as a guide for what to build, with allowances for the necessary tweaks and additions. Money? Someone to do half the work and put it on Github with loads of market-speak? Should I just call up Microsoft's PowerPoint team and ask them to do it? Does everyone who is capable / interested / willing to do this in an everlasting battle with crippling avolition?
I mean, I have made games with PowerPoint. I did that from 2001-2004, and then I got good enough at programming to do it the more versatile way. The games I made aren't exactly accessible, and they were made with Jaws 3.7 in mind (this was the main reason I resisted upgrading for so long, if not the only reason), but I could try and upload the one's I can still access, I suppose. I had one or two on my website, but took them down for some reason. There's a Spider-man fighting game and a point-and-click adventure game with crappy action sequences... A version of LC that I can't open because it's on 10 separate floppies... Are the sounds for the adventure game still on my site? I think they might be. Actually, I think the one with the parachute challenge might still be online. I don't even remember how that was supposed to work. I'ma check.

But yeah let me put out a public beta of EC, then figure out how the pfargtl Git works, and someone else please contribute because I don't have any Ritalin.

[edit]Yes, one powerpoint game is still online. I just opened it in Safari, and of course that just renders it as a series of text and images and not a slideshow that can give you the ability to make choices. Oh, you software companies and making your applications behave more like they were intended, and less like something completely different... tongue [/edit]

Some of my games
Keep up to date by following @Jeqofire on twitter!
Ear Ninja?

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15

@Liam, though you may dislike it (ahem...) I'd highly recommend C/C++ if you want absolute speed and best compilation. I'd recommend Rust... but it's simply too new and doesn't have the maturity that C/C++ has. There are others, of course: Go and Java come to mind. The big problem with Java though is that it's easily decompilable, which makes for really bad commercial games, especially when you implement registration systems; and the problem with Go is that... well, there aren't any good 3D audio systems, though there are good game engines (see https://github.com/avelino/awesome-go). (You might want to check out https://github.com/sindresorhus/awesome for even more.) I also found this one git hub repo that created a loop of git hub repos of awesomeness, so it went awesome, then awesome-awesome, awesome-awesome-awesome... all the way to awesome-awesome-awesome-awesome-awesome-awesome. It was, well, awesome. Rofl!

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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16

Pure Basic all the way. Not only is it easy to work with, it has a lot of built in commands for sound and graphics, both 2D and 3D, and while it may not compare to C/C++ for coding power, the final executables it produces are small, fast, and compare very favorably to C/C++ compiled code.

It's also cross platform in that it's available for Windows, Mac, and Linux, and where appropriate in both 32 and 64 bit versions.

I do know C/C++ from my professional life, but given a choice, I'll always choose Pure Basic over anything else.

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@Orko, there are several negatives that make PureBASIC not suitable any more (yes, it was suitable for DMNB/DMPA, but is not suitable for very advanced projects): scripting, difficult plugins, inaccessibility, and it's commercialism.
Scripting: PB feels a bit like scripting: you get every single thing you could ever want, there isn't much of a challenge to implement things, and, of course, there's no object-orientation at all.
Second, difficult plugins: the only way to extend the language is via either writing your plugins in assembly language or difficult-to-understand C. (The actual code isn't that difficult to understand at first, but it's not very documented, either, and you need .desc files, which I find a bit confusing.)
Inaccessibility: PureBASIC is only accessible on Windows. It has no accessibility whatsoever on Mac OS or Linux, which is incredibly sad; however, it does use CEGUI, so this isn't necessarily the makers of PB's fault, but CEGUI's.
Commercialism: Paying almost $105.00 for a programming language is simply outrageous. It's not even worth that much; the demo only allows you to write up to 800 lines of code and you can't load DLLs. That's all. Paying $105.00 or so just to remove those limits is completely stupid, yet you need to anyway.
Also, one last thing -- unpopularity. PureBASIC seems to be extremely unpopular these days (the latest you can find are libraries from like 2008-2011, which are no longer compatible with PB). If you look up "PureBASIC" (including the quotes to filter out irrelevant results) you only get 226,000 results, but that's just searching for the language itself. The incredible difficulty comes when you run into an issue and use your search engine to attempt to find a solution (because the documentation can be extremely unclear on things). (The fact that it was translated from French might have something to do with that.) You won't find much at all in finding very many solutions, and the ones you do find are usually lucky guesses.
I'm not saying PureBASIC is a bad language; I'm simply saying that if your going to start developing great things, PB might not be the wisest choice.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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18

I see Kotlin as a future game development language. Although it currently works on JVM, it's native compiler is in works. But for writing games like RPGs or actions I think BGT just works well, I think STW, Redspot or Manamon is a best example of what you can do with BGT. I will probably switch to C++ once I get more free time to experiment with SDL2 or DirectX. I was trying to follow tutorial for SDL2 on C++, but I got lost quite easily because I was unsure what a certain function or variable does. C++ devs really love using very short variable names, so reading C++ code written by another person is quite difficult unless it's very well commented. I'm even not so much afraid of pointers like I am afraid of complexity and frustration when e.g. sound device is not properly initialized, audio buffers are not loaded properly, program keeps crashing, etc. BGT will at least save you from a bunch of frustration, because it initializes audio devices and input devices for you, giving you more time to think about game logic.

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19

hello,
i also recommend C++ as it is compiled directly into assembly then native code so it cant easily be decompiled
second, it has lots of libraries which you can use to develop any kind of app
third, it can easily interact with other programming languages like assembly or others (as operating systems use)
but a bad thing about C++ is that it has several compilers which are incompatible to each other

bitcoin address: 1LyQ3hziMC2DTnCtgM3V1zfuZ73P3CYT9P

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@visualstudio, I'd love to here where you found out that C++ compilers aren't compatible with each other. What do you think build systems are for? To resolve that very problem. The only incompatible compilers are the really, really old ones from like 2006. The latest ones have near-similar, if not exactly the same, options as one another, and I haven't found a system that doesn't use visual studio 2017, GCC 7, or Clang 4/5.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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21

C# is also great for game development and software development. It's powerful enough but I heard it can be reverse engeneered. I'm not sure about it though.

Be careful that what you're saying, Just a word Can break your personality!

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22

Python can also be very easily decompiled.

I'm currently learning c++ in my computer science program and I'll probably stick to that. many of the speech libraries though even for c++ are windows specific or would need much rewriting to get them to work comparably to windows. These include that of tolk, universal speech, and others.

I've been working on some speech related stuff for macOS, but nothing close to release yet. school is quite busy at the moment.

I don’t believe in fighting unnecessarily.  But if something is worth fighting for, then its always a fight worth winning.
check me out on Twitter and on GitHub

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@kianoosh, yes, C# can be decompiled if you haven't obfiscated it.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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hello,
@Ethin, i mean in terms of abi and the code which was generated
also compile a C++ code with different compilers and check the generated asm code then you will know that they are different

bitcoin address: 1LyQ3hziMC2DTnCtgM3V1zfuZ73P3CYT9P

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@visualstudio, just because different ASM instructions are different doesn't mean the compiles are totally incompatible. Yes, the ABIs are different, but considering the extremely large amount of instructions in the Intel CPUs alone (I think there's nearly 1000 of them) there's probably a massive amount of redundancy in there. You could, if you wanted to, mix and match asm code for the same architecture and OS but using two different compilers; it's just incredibly difficult to do.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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