High,
my brother and I want to start making an audio game together. We were wondering if you got any pointers to help us get started.

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My advice is to make the smallest, tiniest excuse for a game that you possibly can.  If this means it is a game where you press a key to jump over a pit, and that's the entire game, then you've done a good job.  Once you have a completely working, tiny little game, you can add a few things to it.  Instead of only jumping over pits, now you have to jump over a moving enemy, and perhaps duck under an ogre who swings a club as you walk past.  At each step have a working game, and it will slowly grow into something quite fun.  This is the only sure-fire way to avoid overwhelming yourself with a project idea that is too big to handle yet.

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I agree.
I think what I see a lot of people struggling with is the idea that you have to write a lot of code to get something done. Of course, a lot of code is subjective and it will feel like less and less the more you get in the habit of doing it. It's very easy to lose yourself in ideas you'll never get to. This happens to me all the time, too. It's fine to daydream but don't bite off more than you can chew.

As for pointers where to look, the BGT getting started manual is a pretty good place to start if you want to jump head first into the game making pool. I assume you don't know how to program yet, so if my assumption is wrong, I'm sorry.
It goes over the basic things like variables, conditional statements, methods, classes and so on, all of which you will need at some point or another. Work your way through it slowly and don't be afraid to ask questions.
And most importantly, try things. The best way to get better at coding is by actually coding. Don't be afraid to experiment and see what things do.
Hope to play your games in the future!

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If your looking for audio samples to work with you could also check out the [Big List of Free Sounds].

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Aprone makes a good point. One thing we've suffered through in the development process is "mission creep"—things just kept getting bigger and bigger, and we kept putting more and more on our plates. Ian has had to remind me on several occasions that we have to keep our limitations in mind and start small. And even with those reminders, we've now been working on this game for something like four years. So in addition to Aprone's point, all I can say is, stay dedicated, keep your focus on the end goal, and always remember that everything is going to take longer and be harder than you expect.

Also, take advantage of the resources available to you on this forum. Lots of wonderful, intelligent, generous people. It's really an amazing community.

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