Hello,
@joshknnd1982 I understand your viewpoint, but In my opinion even if Android is getting well in Accessibility related stuff, I think there are some things we couldn't control (even if they say Talkback is Open source), it needs more hardware resources than almost any Linux distribution, lacks some connectivity in most devices (USB, Ethernet, HDMI ports if needed), and these Linux sistems allows you to modify or write every piece of code that can be improved for adding more accessibility to your environment. As @SLJ said, The device will include a set of accessible applications and these applications will be made based in a Library for handling Graphical interfaces, so it will be easier to extend them or add new applications. I can modify and extend the functionality of the default screen reader (I am working in the development team of Fenrir) and every problem will likely to have a bugfix.
@Guitarman now I am totally blind, but I was sighted some years ago. The way I learnt how to work with electronics is not a secret, I learnt the basics when I could see circuitry and diagrams, now I have to ask someone to help me with things that I am not able to do by myself. Usually I am able to read a datasheet and tell to this person (a friend of mine) that I want a circuit with a set of features (inputs, outputs, other boards or GPIO pins in a specified order) and when he is done I can play with them.

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Alright Josh, first of all calm down with the multiple posts. No offense dude, but it gets frustrating going through heading after heading. If you wanna write a novel, do it in a post or two, that's no problem. Also, as great as the rca tablet may be especially for 80 bucks, you really should remember that the US and surrounding countries have a huge marketshare for hundreds of phones and tablets. With that come the insanely cheap tablets. Exclusiveness is also a huge problem as well. There's these cheap ripoff mediatech tablets that are sold via prime, yeah that's right, prime exclusive items, and unless you root them, you've got prime ads all over the place like it's windows 10. Cheap as they may be, those are for prime members. The point is that just because you can get something for next to nothing here in the US, that may mean nothing to a developing country where their equivalent of $80 is so much more for them. Besides, as great as Android is, it can't please everyone, and I've come to understand that Android is really an operating system for the technically inclined group of mobile users, and IOS is for the people that want something that just works. Why do I say this? Android may be accessible out of the box, but more apps are required to enrich the experience. By finding out what works and what doesn't, you really know a lot more about your operating system and its accessibility. It really makes you feel like the phone is yours. But Android can't please everyone. I've seen some folks complaining about the Braillenote Touch because the new Android ui is confusing, the world of apps, stuff like that. They do have valid points. I for one love my Touch, but I also have been a longtime Android user. I've seen it grow with damn near every new release, and a lot of these other people are too quick to judge. My point? Most people who use notetakers aren't ready to dive into an open mainstream operating system, with a world of apps, social media, and malware if you're not careful. As much as I didn't like how the older braillenotes had such a tight shell around windows ce, I could see how useful that could be for someone who's a little hesitant on jumping into the technological world. The MK speech notetaker basically does this, i e, a consistent interface for those who rely on it, with the full power of a Linux box for those who want it. Best of both worlds.

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so mk speech would be sort of like the old braillePlus that ran Linux? where you had a menu, suite of apps, but then if you are more advanced you could run a console with speakup, right? and if you guys use the mate desktop and strip some unneeded stuff out, you could make it real lightweight. Also will it stay up to date with the latest version of orca? if using debian ubuntu mate, it'll need the accessibility PPA added to keep the screen reader updated and if using an arch-base, you could just let it alone because arch has a nice rolling release. also for those who wish, maybe you could contract with oralux and offer IBM viavoice or eloquence for those who want it. pair it with the orbit20 braille display and brltty and you should have a pretty good notetaker that can do a lot of stuff. But orca will probably need modifying to accept 6-key entry, so will the mate desktop I'm guessing. though if you want it as a notetaker and for durability I'd say maybe give it at least 32gb of ssd solid state storeage. Then it will run nice and fast and will be pretty much immune to drops and such. how much will this cost in the united states? I may want to buy one just to have and play around with it. I like all types of OS they are fun to use and play with. oh and you may want to have espeak set to a good sounding voice and set to talk slow for the most understandability.

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I believe he's aiming to sell it for 300 bucks. You're right in that it's basically a modernized/expanded braille plus concept-wise. Except now you also have a desktop. I'm sure Orca will remain up to date. Unfortunately Viavoice, or Voxin as it's called on Linux, is absolutely out of the question because the Viavoice binary can't run on Arm architecture. Trust me, I learned this the hard way when I bought it for my Raspberry Pi. Credit to their excellent customer support, I did get an immediate refund.

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