1

so i've learned enough about bgt so that i think learning a different language will be somewhat easier cause i know some of the fundementals of programming and all that
I've come to realize how limitted and problematic bgt is, so i'm asking the seasoned programmers on here, where should i go from here? maybe c++, python?

i'm currently in the process of learning how to code, if you would like to contact me, skype is preffered, use one of the following:
skype: brennan draves
email: [email protected]
website; not yet up: redfoxproductions.com

Thumbs up

2

that's really up to you and on what are your goals.
I can recommend python because it's pretty easy, but maybe you know enough for starting c/c++?
if you are interensted on web you could try approaching PHP or ruby.In terms of simple things javascript is not difficoult either.

If you want to get in touch with me you can follow me on Twitter
have a nice day.
Paul

Thumbs up

3

Want to simplify the things then go for python. Otherwise out there, VB, C#, C++, Java, JavaScript(note: that's different), PHP, Pearl, Ruby, and many many more are there. It depends on what you want to do, though. So choose carefully on the basis of your requirement and after well research.

Craziest Audio gamer.
email: My Email Id
Facebook: My Facebook

Thumbs up

4

Each language has their own strengths and weaknesses, and your likely to pick up many languages as you go. Don't worry too much about it, as all languages tend to share certain similarities, variables, loops, if statements, functions, etc. so learning one makes it easier to learn others. As always it depends on what your comfortable with, there's no real right answer here since all roads inevitably lead to the same place.

As a general rule, the more complex a language is, the more powerful it can be. The more detailed you can be in your instructions, the more you can get out of it, but this can also make writing and managing all those details more difficult and time consuming. For example, you could probably write a blazingly efficient program in Assembler, but you could probably write it ten times faster in C with an acceptable hit to performance and a bit less detail and low level control, and its the same with C#/Python, less control for faster results and ease of use. Languages like C# and Python tend to handle memory management for you, so it makes it alot more productive to write the core of a program without worrying about the details of memory allocation. But this isn't practical for some applications like OS or processor level functions, which is where other more detailed and low level languages like C/C++ or assembler come in.

As i've mentioned before, asking which language to use can end up getting a thousand different answers as everyone has their own particular preferences. My own recommendation would be Python, as its versatile, has lots of documentation, libraries, examples, and lots of people who can offer help. It can also serve as a good launchpad towards learning other lower level languages like C, if you so desire.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

Thumbs up

5

Another good low-level language is Rust. Rust seeks to act as a (almost) drop-in replacement for C/C++ -- OK, not a very good description, but interesting enough. Rust attempts to prevent you from making all the mistakes you can make in C++ that cause programing safety to be impacted.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

Thumbs up

6

I pretty much agree with what everyone else has already said here. Which language to use from here probably doesn't matter a whole lot as long as you stick with well known and well established languages because they'll have plenty of resources available to help you continue to sharpen your programming skills, and will have a large number of prewritten libraries that can go a long ways towards not having to recode the wheel.

Although I've never done any coding in it myself, based on some of the things I've seen written in it, and from what I've heard from programmer friends who do use it, you can't go too far wrong with Python. A shining example is NVDA, it is written in the language, just to give you an idea of what is possible.

Thumbs up

7

[wow] thanks for all the help guys, looking at your suggestions, i think i'll go with python, at least for now,

i'm currently in the process of learning how to code, if you would like to contact me, skype is preffered, use one of the following:
skype: brennan draves
email: [email protected]
website; not yet up: redfoxproductions.com

Thumbs up