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Hi all,
So as the title says, instead of making maps like bGT devs do for example, how would one go about building maps, with a real world physics library with real objects on them? by real objects I mean the ones as in BK3.
If anyone could explain me a few concepts from physics/math I would need, and if somebody could show me the way to build a 10 by 10 walkable map using a physics library I'd highly appreciate it. The reason I ask this because I don't have any knowledge of maths or physics therefore I'm having issues understanding  the already available examples.
Regards,
Amit

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Hi amit.
I don't personally know how to use physics library, but for creating a map engine, you don't need it.
The way you could try to handle it is placing tiles which are object on a certain position.
You therefore, have to define a tile object, which will be the platform on which the player is walking on, and a map object, which manages tiles, zones, walls etc.
Hope you could understand me

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3

I'm pretty sure tile-maps is what was meant by the reference to BGT devs, for some reason. Makes the following reference to BK3 as object-based kinda amusing.

Answering the question is not so simple, since there's a lot missing that could narrow down which physics library to use, what to put in the map, etc. Most of the examples I run into are not heavy on required physics or math knowledge, though; they're just eye-crossingly tedious.
I think the big missing component is probably geometry. Planes/edges to create the bounds, spheres/capsules/circles for many objects because you actually will run into frustrating results with everything being blocky if most of your moving objects (including the player) are blocky. Boxes/rectangles for walls/platforms, assuming you're not using anything more complicated, such as ramps.
I can't recommend a particular library, because I've never successfully used any of them beyond basic examples. Box2d seems like the least tedious, if 2d is acceptable, but that's just me.

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4

Hi,
Oops, it was not meant to be BK3 lol. The reference was GTA VC. For example, If we play these tile based games the objects like player are passable. SO if I run towards a player on stw or redspot, I won't collide with them, I will pass them and keep going. BUt if I do this same thing in GTA vCthe other people in that game are blocking, so I can't pass them, I'd have to circle around. Please note that I by no means am running after a project which is beyond my capabilities. I'm just setting an example to make things more clear.
And I've barely heard the "geometry". SO how do I go learning about it. I'd like to have a map where you walk on simple grass. a short and simple example would be enough, since all I want to do is grasp these concepts. What are those spheres/boxes etc? and how do you use them to construct your maps? I remember seeing a map editor somewhere maybe it was by you as well, so are you using geometry for that? how.
Regards,
Amit

There once was a moviestar icon.
Who prefered to sleep with the light on.
They learnt how to code, devices sure glowed,
and lit the night using python.

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5

you just need to make certain objects passable like other players and the others impassable like walls etc.

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3D engines like GTA V are not all that dissimilar to 2D tile based engines from a design perspective. Building a 3D map generally involves stacking 3D cube regions of a set dimension together to generate an environment, often of varying shapes and designs to create a more detailed scene. All objects are generally moved in a particular direction to simulate gravity, collisions of objects between each other or what you decide are environment tiles is referred to as Collision Detection, and physics is how they react when a collision is detected between objects in this way, such as bouncing or ricocheting.

Grass in this case would simply be an arbirary designation to an existing tile, like "if grass play grass sound" or "if brick play brick sound", etc. You could try taking a look at the audiocraft prototype [here] which shows some of the concepts, source code included.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

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I'm still not quite sure what BGT devs have to do with what you are asking though. It's perfectly possible to accomplish what you are asking with the language. It has more to do with the design than what language you use. Of course BGT doesn't have a Physics library included, but when it comes to AudioGames at least, there are a lot of shortcuts you can take since we don't have to represent so many things with graphics.

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It's not the language per se, so much as the fact that there are a lot of tile-based BGT games. ... although, I'm actually having a hard time thinking of many, especially since 2012 or so.

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