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Hi everyone,,

Has anyone ever noticed that blind schools are sheltered areas? Example: My school that I went to [California school for the blind] was sheltered and all that. Also about education, have you noticed any education problems with blind schools? Just wondering. For me, their was not really any education system and lack of math, Science, history, ETC. But anyway, shoot out all your opinions guise. Good thing I left CSB, it was a nightmare and a fraud!!

The music program  was bad as well. the teacher yelled at the students. And this is why I also switched to midi instruments and music software like Logic, but anyway. Thanks.

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I never went to one of those places and I'm happy for it. I did public school, and mainstream classes from 6th grade up. I also started doing most things like cooking since the age of 10 and laundry and stuff since 13. When I went off to college, I already knew a lot of the general things for keeping up with myself and so forth, while some of the people there didn't really know how to do laundry. My one room mate couldn't cook, I mean could not cook to save his life. It was so bad we had to unplug the smoke alarm every time he tried. It was good that he had a girlfriend, or he might have starved lol.

I don't see why you ever need to put your kid in a place like that. To me, its dead wrong, and on the part of the parent or parents, I think its laziness. They don't want to teach, maybe they don't understand, so they let this place do it, the problem is, who knows what they do, what that place is really like.

If there were a blind school that would be acceptable to send someone to, I'd have to say it should have the following qualities.
Freedom - Apart from classes and meals, the students should be free to move about he campus until the curfew which would be 10:00. But even then, don't say oh you have to sleep, etc, just say you have to be in. Don't try to take things like phone or shut off the internet. If I give my kid a phone or something, that's my business, you don't get to tell him he can't have it.
Life skills training - Kids should be trained to be self-sufficient. This means learning to cook, at least basic things, learning to clean effectively, which includes doing dishes, wiping up the table and counters, swiffering the floor, etc. Also they should teach at least basic money management techniques, as well as how to shop for grocieries at an actual store. Even though things like Amazon and Walmart are delivering now, its still good to have that experience just in case you need to call on it.
Work study or college preparation - If you want to be a proper school, you need to be guiding students in their junior and senior years towards work or college, which ever they choose to do. Seniors who want to go straight into the workforce should have the opportunity to do a work study, or co-op program where half their day can be spent at a job. Kids looking to go to college (university) for higher education should have the opportunity to fill out college applications and scholarships, PEL grant applications and so on.
In short, like a program that doesn't encourage shelfering, coddling, that teaches academics as well as practical subjects.

I'm a cat! What's mine is mine, and what's yours is mine to :P XD

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Hi Erick.
I also went to CSB for a time. If he's still there, I remember the music teacher very well, wayne something or other. He was a mean, foul-tempered son of a bitch! I had been playing guitar for about a year by then, and I went to him for lessons, and each time he screamed at me, and told me that everything I was taught had been wrong.
But to answer your question, I think the place was very sheltered. You had to do everything a certain way, and exactly the way it was taught to you, or you were doing it wrong. You didn't have freedom, I went out one night to get my medicine from the medical building, I was only gone about five minutes, but when I got back to the dorm, I was screamed at for not telling anybody where I was going. I had many bad experiences there, homesickness being a small part of it which is why I left. I did fine going to a mainstream middle school and high school, everybody told me I would never make it but I did.
@Ironcross, I'm not sure all parents don't want to teach their kids that are blind. For me, my parents got suckered into sending me there. My busy-body of a mobility teacher, played up how good the school would be for me, and they would teach me everything my parents couldn't, which was all lies. She constantly mentioned how it would be the best thing for me until they started to believe it. I went along with it, not realizing how hard it would be for me. When I look back, I think the main reason I went was to make my parents happy and proud of me. However when I did leave it turned out a lot better for me then if I had stayed. My parents have taught me so many things, things that I don't think they would've ever taught me at CSB.

Guitarman.
What has been created in the laws of nature holds true in the laws of magic as well. Where there is light, there is darkness,  and where there is life, there is also death.
Aerodyne: first of the wizard order

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They do get pressured that is true, but my parents told them to fuck off when they stepped over that line.

I'm a cat! What's mine is mine, and what's yours is mine to :P XD

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Hi.
Well the school where I was and still am in Germany is a double edged sword.
The plus factor is that they are trying to achieve independence for every student they have.
You don't live on a huge campus with school buildings, mess hall and dormatorys, the school buildings and all school or work related building are on one campus mostly, students live in flats over the whole city. A flat normaly contains 7 to 8 students, together with one or two overseers which are there if you need help or to organize everything.
You are responsible on your own how you get to school, with more time progressing, you are moving into further away flats because you will get more independend that way.
The problem I am having, or rather one of the problems I am having is that they try to raise you in a certain way. like every school they have their plans on what their students shal learn or not, I can't fully explain what this is now, in a nutshell, they want to have that you say yes and sure thing to everything an older person says.
Well, but luckily for me, I didn't take that and went my own way, even though that got me into trouble with the groups personell and the schools officials quite a lot of times, I was even thrown out of one of those flats ... the best thing that can happen.
Now I live in a self organizing flat together with six others, it basically means we won't have an official here all day, someone is coming only ones or twice a week for general questions and help, the rest of the time we are on our own.
And hel, I love it.

Greetings Moritz.

Hömma, willze watt von mir oder wie, weil wenn nich, dann lass dir mal sagen, laber mir kein Kottlett anne Wange und hömma, wo wir gerade dabei sind, dann iss hier hängen im Schacht, sonns klapp ich dir hier die Fingernägel auf links, datt kannze mir mal glaubn.

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@Iron:

Yeah but not every parent is like that though.
@Guitarman:

I'll add my thoughts...

1. Pushing people to do things one certain way isn't limited to blind schools, I can point to high school math classes in mainstream schools yelling that people who showed their workings and got the answer right but got there by a different method were somehow wrong. One of those guys went on to eventually go to Oxbridge, by the way. That being said I do feel blind everything ramps it up to a huge, huge level though, I do think it's a mindset and culture thing though and a generation thing. I do think there's still the attitude of 'oh blind people are helpless and we gotta save them from themseles' attitude.

@Iron: I've heard tales of kids threateneing having their funding pulled if they didn't go to those  schools, and that happened on both sides of the pond, Much as I adore the hell out of the woman who ran the visual services team, which is the new name for the VI tieam...politics dictated her team pulled the 'you go to this school or your funding and welfare gets cut' argument. By the way before anyone starts citing laws and bitching that is 'illegal', no, no it wasn't at the time it happened to me. Now I've never found out if my funding DID get cut off but since I changed areas, it's a moot point.

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well, I went to and graduated from th Texas school for the blind, and had a good experience, for the most part. They actually had a good music program, theatre, sports, whic I didn't play, because I'm not an athlete, taught necessary skills to be independant, had a work program, pretty much exactly how you described it, and incouraged being independant. The few things that I didn't like, I could understand why were the case. You had to tell a staff where you were going, That was, because, since it's a  state agency, they're responsible for you, even if you're an adult, you had to get cleared by your teachers, the principal, and your O and M instructor to be ableYeah, they had a set lights out time, and if caught, you could have your tech confiscated, but they never had cameras, or shut off the internet, like I've heard of other schools doing, and if you got into it, there were four apartments, if you were one of the lucky four, you were basically on your own, no staff watching over you, you had to do everything yourself. That's why I get offended when people say that I went to a Braille Jail, or the like, because this school wasn't like all the other ones, in most ways. to travel off campus.

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I didn't lose my vision until late in life so I never had to go to one of those schools for the blind. But if the way some of my family members try to coddle me even after I've demonstrated over the last five years that I don't need it, is an example of how most people react to blind people, it wouldn't surprise me at all if the schools for the blind are rather sheltered places.

Considering that before I lost it, my vision was always fairly poor, I sometimes wonder if I wouldn't have been better off in a special needs program, because the main stream schools I went to wouldn't do anything at all to help me cope with my vision limitations. So I often ended up in classes where I couldn't see anything that was going on because I was forced to sit in the back of the room because my last name began with a W.

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Hi.
Yeah here to, when there is a place you want to go and you haven't learned the way, you would need some lessons of O/m training and you would get an official certificate that you are allowed to go there.
Well, I mostly broke that rule and went on my way because to be honest, I don't want to firstly do a pile of lessons even though the destination is only about 10 minutes away, hel, now adays I independently travel by train to nearby villages.
And yep, confiscating tech was also done when I was younger.
When I received my first iPhone they took it away at night because I had been doing stuff with it while I should be sleeping.
It was said that they wanted to do this for the hole year, but well, let me tell you how confusing a chinese or japanese dashboard and an alarm at 3:30 in the morning can be, one week after they started taking the phone I had it back and they stopped doing that.

Greetings Moritz.

Hömma, willze watt von mir oder wie, weil wenn nich, dann lass dir mal sagen, laber mir kein Kottlett anne Wange und hömma, wo wir gerade dabei sind, dann iss hier hängen im Schacht, sonns klapp ich dir hier die Fingernägel auf links, datt kannze mir mal glaubn.

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