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Today I was trying out DETROIT Become Human demo. It was hard but I manage to finish the demo. There are 7 or 8 different endings. So I test it all out. I wish these kind of games are accessible. So it'll be much easier for us to play. Anyway, here's is the back story of it. This is the article that's one of the player wrote.

By 2038, robots have replaced people in most common jobs. Aside from a glowing circle that sits near their temple, they would be almost completely indistinguishable
from the living, breathing people they were crafted to look like. It should come as no surprise, then, that it was only a matter of time until they begin
doing things they haven’t been programmed for — slowly but surely gaining sentience and giving way to an uprising. Androids run the world, and humans are
just living in it.

That’s what life is like in the city of Detroit 20 years in the future in
Detroit: Become Human,
a new game from studio Quantic Dream launching on May 25 for the PlayStation 4. Become Human, developed by the same studio responsible for cinematic adventure
games Heavy Rain and Beyond Two Souls, centers on the lives of three androids: Kara, Markus, and Connor. You control all three robots at different points
in the game, watching as their storylines gradually converge. At its core, Detroit: Become Human aims to tackle the difficult question of what happens
to the world as a new class of super-humans that don’t need to sleep and never get sick begin to emerge. As the player, your decisions influence nearly
every aspect of the game.

In one scenario, I played as an android named Markus, who is owned by an elderly wheelchair-bound painter named Carl Manfred. Markus serves as Carl’s caretaker:
he administers Carl’s medication, cooks and serves Carl his meals, and assists with other household tasks. Their relationship seems straightforward, but
the situation changes when Carl asks Markus to do something he wasn’t designed to do: create artwork of his own. As the player, it’s up to you to choose
how Markus navigates the situation and decide what his painting says about his outlook of the world.

In a more high-stakes scenario, I played as Connor, an android who has been tasked with saving a young girl taken hostage by a rogue android. This involved
searching the area for clues and making decisions about how to best approach the android, including what to say and how to say it. Do you want to empathize
with the android? Should you reassure him that everything will be O.K. if he lets the girl go, or do you want to be more realistic about the consequences
of his actions? These are the types of decisions you’ll have to make.

Even after playing Detroit: Become Human for only a brief time, it’s evident that there’s a huge struggle between humans and androids in terms of the roles
they assume in this new world. When Connor shows up to save the child from the android abductor, for example, a woman assumed to be her mother becomes
understandably distressed when she realizes an android was sent to save her daughter, instead of a real human. Similarly, Carl’s son Leo accuses his father
of loving Markus more than him in one scene in which Carl refuses to give his son more money. It’s clear that this dynamic is bound to play a significant
part in the game’s story.

Like Quantic Dream’s previous releases, much of the gameplay in Detroit: Become Human is done through the use of quicktime events, or on-screen prompts
that tell the player which buttons to press in order to complete an action. Based on my brief experience playing the game, nearly everything short of actually
walking must be done in this way: painting a canvas, setting a package down on the table, opening a door, and so on. What’s different about the way quicktime
events are done in Detroit: Become Human, however, is that instead of pressing one of the action buttons, the game asks you to move the right analog stick
in a particular direction.

I found this to be a bit confusing at first; I would sometimes accidentally move the camera by pushing the right stick instead of completing the requested
action. It also seemed like my response to each quicktime event would only work if character was perfectly lined up with the command being shown on the
screen. That being said, I did get the hang of the controls after playing through Connor’s segment, but it’s worth noting that this took some getting used
to.

Detroit: Become Human gives you plenty of freedom to explore and examine the environment, but does provide some guidance to ensure that you remain on track
to complete your current objective. When I tried to access other parts of the apartment I had been investigating while playing as Connor to learn more
about the kidnapper, for example, the game blocked off certain areas until I had completed the next step in the mission.

Although Detroit: Become Human sounds like a science-fiction story, it doesn’t really look like one. Aside from humanoid robots, Quantic Dream’s depiction
of a futuristic city seems to be void of other sci-fi clichés like flying cars or meal replacement pills. Detroit in 2038 is much more in tune with our
current world, making the game’s universe feel a bit more like that of Black Mirror than The Jetsons. This was intentional, according to game director
and Quantic Dream founder David Cage, who says he spoke with artificial intelligence experts to pinpoint specific technologies that will actually be feasible
in the near future.

Detroit: Become Human isn’t a game that you want to play so much as one you’re excited to watch. As the player, you almost feel like a bystander watching
as your world gradually starts to unravel, at least during the portion I got to play. It’s not so much about what’s happening to your character as it’s
about what’s happening to the people and androids around you. In a sense, Detroit: Become Human is a little like the popular HBO series Westworld and Alex
Garland’s Ex Machina. All three attempt to tell their story from the android’s perspective, or at least create some empathy for them. While your missions
will sometimes consist of mundane everyday tasks like making breakfast or cleaning the garage, don’t be fooled. There always seems to be a larger story
unfolding in the background.

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I'm so hyped for that game. First, it's from Quantic Dreams and I love their previous interactive films. And it's a blade runneresque story. How much better can it get? I watched all previous titles as Let's Plays because I can't imagine how they can be playable.

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Hi targor!!!

I played their two previous titles Heavy Rain Beyond Two Souls. I love it. It's just took me awhile to finishd the games.

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[wow] that's awesome. Are you completely blind?

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Yes I'm completely blind. It's take me awhile to get use to the controller.

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6 (edited by targor 2018-04-25 00:51:58)

What first comes to mind is that pain test in Heavy Rain where you had to navigate a maze of electricity wires while also correctly using the quick time events to crawl through the openings. That must have been real hell. In general, I would think that Beyond is easier than Heavy Rain because it allways moves on with the story if you fail the quicktime events, while in Heavy Rain, a character dies.

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I agreed. Heavy Rain give me a lot of difficulty. I have to play that game over and over a few times. But on Beyond Two souls much easier.

One of the part on Beyond Two Souls I have to do was healing the characters. That's the hardest part in the game. Are you going to try the  DETROIT Become Human demo out?

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Sadly, I have no PS4 to try it.

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Aww. I could see if I upload the gameplay on youtube soon.

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hello everyone, I am also really looking forward to the full release.
since the demo is finally out here, it's currently sitting at my downloads list. sooner or later, I'm going to download this game and try it out.
I've never played any games from quantic dream before, so I have to learn how the controls work. I have tried other interactive movie style games like the telltale series, however to me all the game is the same, choices doesn't have any greater impact, only just a little, just like watching an animated shows where all the endings are pre-determined.

let's go, mate. aliens have gone mad, trying to conquer this world. I set up my ship's power to full,
I run around the battlefield,
I use everything to help me defeat those alien ships and finally the mothership itself,
I am the outbackstronaught! all the aliens will be eliminated, restoring piece to the world

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I'd love to play this, but alas, I don't have a PS4 (and probably won't). Quite sad, that... but heh.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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I like their style of games actually. On DETROIT if you don't gather enough clues that could back fire on you.

Try it out Hanif. Takes a lot of patient for this game.

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Detroit seems rather interesting, there was an article over on polygon [here] discussing some of the differences between it and Quantic Dreams previous titles. For example, if you pause the game and after each section they put in a screen showing the possible choices and outcomes you could have had via a tree list, and you can restart from various checkpoints within sections. The tree's aren't explicit in what you've missed though, only showing locked branches of possible unknown outcomes.

-BrushTone v1.3.1: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

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Also the people ask David how many endings are there? He said he doesn't know. It's amazing over 4000 pages long. I'm looking forward to the game.

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The hostage scene alone can be completed in, I think, 6 or 7 different ways. If this works out for the whole game, then I'm speechless.

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a good game,
but  sadly sony is a selfish bitch  and  no PC version

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@dragons have you got all endings in the demo?

let's go, mate. aliens have gone mad, trying to conquer this world. I set up my ship's power to full,
I run around the battlefield,
I use everything to help me defeat those alien ships and finally the mothership itself,
I am the outbackstronaught! all the aliens will be eliminated, restoring piece to the world

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I got three so far. Take me three hours on each ending.

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Could you tell me how the choice system in this game?

let's go, mate. aliens have gone mad, trying to conquer this world. I set up my ship's power to full,
I run around the battlefield,
I use everything to help me defeat those alien ships and finally the mothership itself,
I am the outbackstronaught! all the aliens will be eliminated, restoring piece to the world

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When you first start the demo. They take you to the 17 floors. Your job is to find out what happen to the crimes. The more clues that you find will imfacts your choices to save the little girl. There are six endings that I got so far. One of them you could sacrifice yourself to save the little girl. Also you can press R2 to use Investigate mode. Another thing you could go back in time to find out what happen. But one thing I suggest just play the game through.

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thanks for the explanation on what to do in the demo.
I'm going to download it to my PS4 and I'll try that one for sure.
some more questions: when you are prompted with a dialog choice, do I need to press a button to choose that dialog option or is it through a menu? in other interactive movie titles, such as life is strange or the telltale series, when you are prompted with a decision you have to press either X, square, triangle or the circle button to pick a choice.
one more thing, about navigation. how does the navigation works in this game or any other series by quantic dream? do I need to press the action buttons to interact, examine objects, talk to people ETC? also how does the QTE works in all the games from quantic dream?

let's go, mate. aliens have gone mad, trying to conquer this world. I set up my ship's power to full,
I run around the battlefield,
I use everything to help me defeat those alien ships and finally the mothership itself,
I am the outbackstronaught! all the aliens will be eliminated, restoring piece to the world

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When you talking to the peoples. Press X for that.

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@dragons, I've played this one, however I'm stuck after talking to the captain.
when it says that I need to find some clues, I press the R2 button however I don't know how to navigate while in the investigation mode.
any tips?

let's go, mate. aliens have gone mad, trying to conquer this world. I set up my ship's power to full,
I run around the battlefield,
I use everything to help me defeat those alien ships and finally the mothership itself,
I am the outbackstronaught! all the aliens will be eliminated, restoring piece to the world

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24 (edited by Dragons 2018-04-29 06:48:23)

Try to use the right analog stick as well. Oh do you use headphone to play?

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yes I'm using headphone to play.
also, in the investigation mode, do I need to press either X, square, triangle or the circle button? and also, after I talk to the captain, sometimes when I walk around I hear someone shooting, and then suddenly someone shot me down and I have no idea on what to do other than going to the pause menu and restart the game from the beginning.

let's go, mate. aliens have gone mad, trying to conquer this world. I set up my ship's power to full,
I run around the battlefield,
I use everything to help me defeat those alien ships and finally the mothership itself,
I am the outbackstronaught! all the aliens will be eliminated, restoring piece to the world

Thumbs up