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In the fall I will be moving to data-structures ii. Currently in data structures i, we we have focused on linear data structures: array, linked lists, stacks, and queues. Data structures ii will introduce non-linear structures: trees and graphs. Has anyone had experience with college or equivalent level course work? How did professors relate the information for the structures to you as the student for homework and exams?

I have read this first topic and this second one. The GSK tool found here looks promising, but i'm wondering how efficient making the graphs would be. plus my main OS is MacOS and while I do have access to Windows, it is not my preferred system.

I have used planttext for making diagrams and things for my system analysis and design class and for parts of my discrete math class. however, the output of this isn't accessible. I can see them a touch with super magnification and super high contrast, but i can't do that for long.

apart from writing things out in a planttext form or as words, is there a better way of making accessible trees and graphs?

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While I haven't taken this course yet, this, this, this, and this may help you with trees, though this Google search I did may also give you more results. As for graphs, I've never programmed one before (though it would be interesting to do so), but a quick search found this, this and this, though, again, this Google search may also point you to some results too. I know, my links weren't very descriptive, but the context should tell you what each link takes you (or should take you) for information on the topic in question. You may also find other interesting data structures like quotient filters and Ctries here.

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3 (edited by magurp244 2018-04-24 02:35:04)

It didn't come up at the time, but another option could be a 3D pen like the 3Doodler Start mentioned [here]. It has a variety of applications, but lately they've started a push to get it into classrooms for helping visually impaired students and teachers, with it an instructor or yourself could freehand draw tactile tree's or graphs for example.

-BrushTone v1.3.3: Accessible Paint Tool
-AudiMesh3D v1.0.0: Accessible 3D Model Viewer

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@Ethin, I wasn't asking about what are trees and graphs. I actually mostly know what they are from reading on my own and podcast and the like. I'm wondering about the way of conveying the information of a tree or graph from my professor to me as a blind student.

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@4, I know. I just thought those may help in assisting in the conveyance by giving a textual description of what they look like. Post 3 might also solve your problem. smile

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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I just kinda listen and visualize? The visualizations seem like aids for the benefit of sighted people, and ideally they don't draw up diagrams when coding. ... Right? So unless there's an assignment or test where you have to write the code represented by a diagram, I'm not sure it'd matter much?

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At first, when you learn about trees, it's easy to follow along. Trees are just an extension on linked lists. Then, when you get into traversing algorithms etc, it becomes a bit more challenging to visualize paths. For this, as an aid, I made use of the Draftsman from APH. I'm sure a quick google search can give you the exact URL from which you can purchase it. This thing has been quite a blessing in classes like Circuits and other such Electrical Engineering courses.

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8

So, I just finished a semester where for one of my classes we were studying trees. Just had the final exam for the subject yesterday.

as for conveying tree structures, you might try representing them as nested blocks, the same you'd in code. so, it would be something like:
a{
    B{},
    C{
        D{}
    }
}

in this example there is a tree with the root node A, which has a child node
b. and
C. B has no children and C has a child node D. D has no children.

If you think about it, code blocks are one big tree, so what is used to represent them can be used for trees as well.

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