1 (edited by mahdi 2018-01-08 18:02:08)

hi guys!
i want download dm, and eset smart says:
Access denied
Access to the web page was blocked.  Show URL
The web page is on the list of websites with potentially dangerous content.
i need desafio mortal!
how i can get it? i cant desable eset.
if you guys can, upload latest version and give me link, thanks!

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Well, if its blocking the site, it will probably block the game executable also.

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3

damn stupid anti viruses someone must tell them that bgt games are not virus

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4

Unfortunately the only way that's going to happen is if the author of BGT contacts the anti virus vendors and declares a false positive and since he abandoned it, I don't think that Phil would be inclined to bother.

So the only thing you can do is set up your anti virus program to ignore programs written in BGT.

Rather than open up possible avenues for a virus or other malware to slip past my anti virus protection, I simply remove anything the anti virus doesn't like.

Sure, that means I will miss out on some games, but they are only games, and I'd rather be safe than sorry.

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big_smile
smile
djt dalison dont give me answer

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6

As I have said more than once, the reason that BGT games are considered viruses or malware is because BGT games are JIT-compiled. The BGT interpreter is embedded into the game, and the main function is jumped to -- not executed, but jumped to - when the game is run. Programs like that are flagged all the time because jumping around with code execution like that could cause disastrous results.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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I will never understand how can people use an antivirus without being able to add items into it's exceptions list. I don't use any antivirus in fact, but ok I can get that not everyone is able to be safe in that way. But using a program without later being able to configure it, turn it off or if you want to change it uninstall it? No thanks.

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8

Well its not just bgt, it happens to some vb6 games to and maybe others some say eurofly and quentin c is doing this.
We can establish a few things.
1.  jit compilation of anything is just not a good idea to even bother with.
2.  all security software seems to target blind spaciffic software because no one likes us obviously look at mozilla, to make things more secure turn off access.
Maybe we should quit mainstream products fully and switch back to our blindy stuff and let the sighted try to use it.
I am not for making antivirus die and never use it thats just asking for trouble but I am close to actually doing that.
What I will probably do is have directories in program files both x86 and 64 for games and such I am unsure about even screen readers, and just have them never process by antivirus at all which is actually dangerous to even bother excluding things.
I have excluded parts of my backup drive though because of this fact and in my new system, who knows.
I will have to have some unprocessed folder for downloads I am not sure if they will choak or not to.
Windows defender is the easiest to configure its not the best but its easy to configure.
If the blindy tech prices droped, I am tempted to just use that for things and maybe something like xp for offline games, and maybe something else for online.

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actually you can disable eset from the system tray temporarily. this will let you download the file but there's a good chance it'll delete it when you restart eset. weirdly though it wouldn't let me download cheat engine recently so I turned it off, downloaded it, turned eset back on and scanned the file and it was fine.

if duct tape doesn't fix it, you haven't used enough.

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@crashmaster, point two is incorrect. Security software doesn't target us because they hate us. They just find something wrong with the program that we don't know about. And since we don't know about it could be an indefinite number of things.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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Oh gosh, targetting blind people specifically. How can somebody even think that is beyond me. Yes, everybody hates us but this same Mozilla which you mention bothers to fix what they broke even though they hate us. First, they didn't turn of access like you said. They got rid of browser injections, which is indeed bad and causes browser attacks and everyone is slowly getting rid of it. Edge already doesn't allow it, chrome will soon as well though they've said they will allow it for accessibility services. Screen reader developers are there to blame, not Mozila like most people think. NVDA will work just like it did with Mozila very soon, and jaws once FS decides to stop with their old ways of doing things because we don't live in the Windows XP world, but it does seem like some people still do.

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@8 I'm just... gonna keep my mouth shut... because, I'd just get myself in trouble.

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13

o i think its good, i'm going to test it

SirBadger wrote:

actually you can disable eset from the system tray temporarily. this will let you download the file but there's a good chance it'll delete it when you restart eset. weirdly though it wouldn't let me download cheat engine recently so I turned it off, downloaded it, turned eset back on and scanned the file and it was fine.

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oh, about firefox, my computer crash when i enter mozilla firefox 57 with nvda. is it a problem from my processer or what

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15

If I could get a hold of the last 32 bit version of VMware Player, I'd set up a virtual machine to play BGT and other games on that MSE flags as having a virus. The virtual machine wouldn't have an anti virus so the games could run on it, and my host system could still be secure with no exceptions define in its anti virus.

Unfortunately VMware doesn't keep an archive of past versions on their web site, so the only thing available there are the current 64 bit versions.

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Orko, while it is not from the official site, when I used a 32 bit operating system, I used this one and it worked just fine. http://grossgang.com/vmware/VMware-play … 744117.exe

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nidza07, Thank you! I don't care if it comes from VMware's site. I'm not certain that v6 was the last 32 bit version, but it's definitely later than anything I've got.

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Ethin wrote:

As I have said more than once, the reason that BGT games are considered viruses or malware is because BGT games are JIT-compiled. The BGT interpreter is embedded into the game, and the main function is jumped to -- not executed, but jumped to - when the game is run. Programs like that are flagged all the time because jumping around with code execution like that could cause disastrous results.

BGT code is not jit compiled. The AngelScript source code is compiled into byte code. The byte code is interpreted by a virtual machine.
This is still probably enough to cause an antivirus to bat an eye. I'm sure it doesn't help that there's a block of data hanging from the end of the executable file, and the program is making decisions based on it.

Proud to be the official hosting provider for http://www.vgstorm.com!

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19

@Trajectory, I stand corrected then. Still, that's exactly why antivirus apps flag BGT games -- i's that VM embeddedness into the executable and that block of data at the end.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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greetings. Just apart from that, is the Game server back up again? My last info was that the game was shut down due to the fact that the developers wanted to rewrite the whole thing. I might be wrong on this so if anything happened in bitween than i missed it. Thanks in advance, Marcel.

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21

Data after the program won't cause a virus warning because it is a very common practice. Nor will the fact that a virtual machine to run the intermediate code being imbedded cause one either because it too is a very common practice. But if an anti virus doesn't like the way some code in the virtual machine looks and decides to flag it as a virus, every program written that uses that virtual machine will similarly be flagged.

There are really only two solutions.
1. Add affected executables to your anti virus's exceptions list so it won't be scanned.

2. The author of the virtual machine needs to contact the anti virus vendor and declare that their flagging of his program is a false positive.

A possible work around is to use an executable compressor like PKLite or UPX. This will change the way the executable looks to the anti virus program and might avoid it being flagged as having a virus.

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22

hi,
I don't care if the server is up or down, its a clone anyway that should've died a decade ago and should've never started. Start coding your own things and publish it. Just look at some of the nice games we got without cloning code, a hero's call for example.
Get rid of the old ultrapower sidescroller shit and start working on more modern stuff.

kind regards and have a nice day,
marro
just you can find me on most multiplayer games with this name lol. If you wish to come in contact with me, just pm me on stw, i'm around there for the most.

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23

hi, for fight to the death, go to fight to the death's topic,
and, who can upload dm for me?

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24 (edited by Ethin 2018-01-10 15:39:04)

@21, I've found that UPX (for Python anyway) makes bad executable images. As in, so bad that windows can't execute them and raises a bad image error. It might be the flags I use but...
Edit:
Keep in mind that while both techniques are common (keeping data at the end of executables (which makes it easy to extract depending on the VM used) and embedding VMs into executables as well) it's also something a hacker could use. Metasploit, for instance, which is a penetration testing tool (but is also used for hackers because of it's functionality) can create an executable based off of a previous executable (like TeamTalK, for instance) and bind a virus to it to run in a separate thread. So it's more likely that AV software picks this up and flags it as a virus because BGT does the exact same thing that virus/malware manufacturers do. (And no, I'm not going to tell you how metasploit does it, even if I know. Nor am I giving you guys a link to study said attached virus, either, if I did create one for your analysis.)
And since we know that point two will *never* happen....

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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It isn't just BGT that appends intermediate code to the end of a run time virtual machine, Real Basic does it and so does Auto It, as two such examples. Also every multimedia authoring system does it as well, as does flash  and shockwave players, and so on, and they don't often get flagged with false positives. So in the case of BGT, it has to be the way its run time virtual machine is implemented that causes the false positives.

One thing you can do that might help if your anti virus program allows it. Most modern anti virus programs have a heuristic algorithm that attempts to detect as yet unknown viruses by analyzing code or code behavior, unfortunately these algorithms, more often than not, generate false positive than actual detections, so I've always turned off such features where allowed. Unfortunately, unless there is a registry hack to do it, MSE doesn't have such an option.

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