101

@99 that is a useful feature indeed. I know that Eclipse has that feature as well, although even more general use than that.

by using alt+up you expand your selection, by alt+down you shrink it. expanding the selection will also select the containing context for example let me give you following example code:

class MyClass {
public void myFunction(String s) {
if(condition)
otherFunctionCall(arg1, arg2);
}
}

lets say, your cursor is on the arg1 token. if you expand selection once, it will select the whole list or arguements, expanding again will select also the body of the if block, expanding further will select the block of the function, expanding further will select the class.

you can then delete and paste or whatever, even use alt+up/down to shift the selection up or down.

and Eclipse has autocompletion, although not as good as VS code. and the indent nav NVDA addon works in it perfectly.

not hating on Ride, just saying that the feature unique to Ride, indent navigation, has been made into a general nvda addon and there are more feature rich editors/IDEs out there.

not sure about VS, but im sure there must be a block selection feature.

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102

@nidza07, My posts are not useless; I am quite accurately listing out why it is neither a code editor nor an IDE. And practically everything is true, whether you necessarily agree with it or not. Use RIDE at your coding job and ee how long your forced to use an actual code editor or IDE. It'll be pretty damn fast, that's for sure.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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103

Yeah, pretty cool but this isn't aimed to be an editor you will professionally use at your job. This is just a small utility designed to solve one specific problem. Whether you will use it or no highly depends on your use case. You have no use for it, that is pretty okay, but please get over bashing this thing and move on with using a real IDE because you clearly have no use for this so cannot understand why somebody would use it.

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104

@103, yes, I cannot understand why someone would use it since there are already tools that solve this problem. Perhaps I'm over-analyzing it, but it just seems pointless to me. Something open-source would probably be a better alternative, IMO...

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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105

Alright, people use different software for different things if you didn't know. Somebody might not want to install the huge visual studio package simply because they wont need all the features, and might just want a simple script to do this. If you already use VS and need it for other things, then this is just another feature you will have as a bonus, but not everybody uses that. The indent nav addon comes to my mind too, but note that this program was released before that addod, thus when it was developed that addon didn't exist.

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106

@104, the thing is that you can customize what you want VS to have. You don't need to install everything. You should go through the install sometime; you can make it as small as 2 GB.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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107

2 GB is smaller for you than this utility provided it is the only thing you need? Alright then.

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108 (edited by Ethin 2018-08-08 21:39:24)

@107, consider the 2GB mark a baseline. I don't know how truly small you can make it. And no, my install is more around 80 or so gB. But that's because I selected everything.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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109

The point being? Even if you can make it 1 GB, that is still way, way larger than a small utility for one feature.

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110

My point being that a program that provides much more than just this utility (and that program can actually help you get things done in a productive way and is used by mainstream developers) will get you further than if you use a utility that 99 percent of the world dosn't even know exists and probably wouldn't give a glance to.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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111

99 percent of the world is not blind, so does not need keyboard shortcuts to navigate through indentation in the first place. Also, you do not understand the point that a program does not need to be the most popular one for you to use it. If you use only popular programs, then well, have fun with them.

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112

@111, I never said I only use popular programs. I simply said that, for something like this, the more popular program may be a better option. This utility could've been written as a visual studio extension, for example.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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113

What is the point of doing that if, as you said, visual studio already offers this functionality?

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114 (edited by Ethin 2018-08-09 23:29:17)

@nidza07, there wouldn't be. It could be done as an experiment, or as a learning project. I myself in fact got the opportunity to beta-test an extension called CodeTalk. I still have the email where the researcher and I were discussing my participation. I can't remember though why it was dropped -- my participation that is... smile I don't even know if the plugin is still being worked on. Its last commit was 0c5c313 on February 7, so I guess it is, though irregularly. That plugin though focuses more on Glanceability (if I remember right it provided you a tree-view to navigate your code), Real-Time Error information (it played sounds and gave you feedback when an exception was thrown among other things), and Accessible Debugging (it certainly made the debugging experience much easier). Technically this utility does something similar, but not exact; it gives you your code in a tree-like form, but neither makes the debugging experience better nor does it give you real-time error information. You can watch Microsoft Research demoing it at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttkNYaPwn6E.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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115

Very on topic right? Anyways, a program has it's purpose and it can but does not have to go beyond it. Glad you helped with a plugin, but this topic doesn't need to care about that.

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116

Rofl true. And I didn't really help with it, more like beta-tested it.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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117

Not everything is about "but people don't use this at a job! Job! Job! job..."

Using hobbyist tools for hobbyist developers is perfectly fine. Just because it's not popular doesn't mean it won't be useful to someone.

The tool I used to decompile a .NET assembly into source code was about 200 Kb in size and it took about 10 Google searches before I found it, which means it wasn't popular. But it worked for my use case.

Sometimes, people are doing things for their own passions and not for future job prospects, a fact that growing older will help some of us realize. The end goal isn't always a job. So, what if it doesn't help in the job market? So what? People using BGT will find it useful, which means OP has an audience. Yeah, a lot of us won't find it useful, and a few of us out of that "a lot" group have been around a few years to really not need a tool like this. But going around shooting down someone's project is discouraging future budding developers.

You know...my first language (ever!) was BNS BASIC. Can you imagine if someone had told me "Hey, stop using it! People don't use it at a job!"? I probably would not have pursued further programming opportunities from BNS BASIC, and would have ended up taking a different path altogether.

Instead, everyone around me encouraged me to hone my programming skills (I was 12 at the time.) And they'd be so proud when I'd release my little games in BNS BASIC. Today, I'm a full-fledged Software Engineer working on God only knows what.

So some of us can discourage people all we want to because they're not doing things how (you) do them, and you have a right to your opinion. But in the words of a famous comedian, I have a right to my opinion also and my opinion is that you don't have a right to your opinion, because you're selling people short.

I really wish developers would stop coming on here and discouraging other budding developers simply because they're not "up there" with you, oh high and mighty.

Welcome to the information age, where everyone thinks they know everything and so everyone is above everyone.

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118 (edited by Ethin 2018-08-12 02:40:16)

@117, I do see your point. I just consider it redundant since technically this is already done with VS, even though there's not a detect-scope type thing with it.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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