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Funny Turtlepower, at  the school for the blind I attended it was the other way around. if you had any usable vision you were made to feel guilty for having it,  for example  if you were playing a game with a totally blind person, often the staff would give the total person some really amazingly unfair  advantage, for example I once remember myself and one other eight year old playing football against four ten year old boys  and it was held to be fair because we could see, never mind the fact we were smaller and ran less far, and the blasted ball with the bell  wasn't at all visible anyway big_smile.

This was definitely an attitude fostered by teachers,  for example if I said "I watched a tv program" I was instantly corrected to "you mean you listened to it" and talking about colours or anything else was actively discouraged, heck they even missed the "he gave us eyes to see them" verse of the old hymn all things bright and beautiful.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

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How strange, Dark. Do you think that they had good intentions--by attempting to discourage discussion of vision, they would be making people feel less sad for being blind?

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Nope Tjt, I think it was all about systematisation and control. It was a school for the blind so everyone had to be "blind" to fit into the same mould and anyone who deviated from that whether in behaviour or even in amount of vision had to be made to fall into line with their system.

My brother coined the term "clockwork mice" for those who'd finished specialist schools, and it was unfortunately quite  accurate one.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

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@zakc93 I'll have you know that my parents have been very good with taking care of me for almost 18 years that I've been on this planet, I'd hardly call them uninformed. Each parent razes their kid differently, there is no expected standard for how to raze a visually impaired child. As for mainstream schools, they do go out of their way to purchase technology for VI students. Sometimes, especially for my school, they make you use their technology and don't allow you to use anything else that they don't have experience with or don't like, despite weather or not you feel more comfortable using it. They also don't let me bring in my personal computer because it has to go through a process, to make sure it has the software they think you need on it. So basically, they're restrictive in terms of technology. Apparently, my school is the only school that does this.

Hey guys. My punchback radio show is starting to take off. If you want to check it out, our Twitter is @punchback2017, the Skype group is here, and our Facebook page is here

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I started school in a public school which had a classroom specifically for the blind students in the area in side it. We got to go home every night, and we never really interacted with the sighted kids there at first. But as I entered 3rd grade, I started to mainstream slowly into lessons with sighted peers.
They increased the amount of mainstream time until the end of 4th grade, when they thought I was ready for full time mainstreaming. I then went to public school from grade 5 on. Compared to some of you guys's experiences, I had on ok time.
Public school, on the other hand, was a nightmare. People were always horrible to me. But I wouldn't have changed how it went, I would've never stood for being in the school for the blind full time. I couldn't handle the way they want to control every aspect of life. I am a rebel and probably would've been kicked out anyway if I had to deal with anything close to some of the things listed above.
It's really interesting to read about everybody's experiences. They make me glad I never went to one full time.

Stevie-3

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