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@Green Gables Fan, RAID stands for 'redundant array of independent disks'. It's a method of data storage where you have several disks which can, theoretically, offer you more space than you actually have. So if you have four disks of 4TB each, you can have 16TB total -- at least, that's what your computer will tell you. There are ten levels of RAID, and I'll just quote from Wikipedia -- it describes these a bit better than I can, I think:

  • RAID 0 consists of striping, without mirroring or parity. The capacity of a RAID 0 volume is the sum of the capacities of the disks in the set, the same as with a spanned volume. There is no added redundancy for handling disk failures, just as with a spanned volume. Thus, failure of one disk causes the loss of the entire RAID 0 volume, with reduced possibilities of data recovery when compared with a broken spanned volume. Striping distributes the contents of files roughly equally among all disks in the set, which makes concurrent read or write operations on the multiple disks almost inevitable and results in performance improvements. The concurrent operations make the throughput of most read and write operations equal to the throughput of one disk multiplied by the number of disks. Increased throughput is the big benefit of RAID 0 versus spanned volume, at the cost of increased vulnerability to drive failures.

  • RAID 1 consists of data mirroring, without parity or striping. Data is written identically to two drives, thereby producing a "mirrored set" of drives. Thus, any read request can be serviced by any drive in the set. If a request is broadcast to every drive in the set, it can be serviced by the drive that accesses the data first (depending on its seek time and rotational latency), improving performance. Sustained read throughput, if the controller or software is optimized for it, approaches the sum of throughputs of every drive in the set, just as for RAID 0. Actual read throughput of most RAID 1 implementations is slower than the fastest drive. Write throughput is always slower because every drive must be updated, and the slowest drive limits the write performance. The array continues to operate as long as at least one drive is functioning.

  • RAID 2 consists of bit-level striping with dedicated Hamming-code parity. All disk spindle rotation is synchronized and data is striped such that each sequential bit is on a different drive. Hamming-code parity is calculated across corresponding bits and stored on at least one parity drive. This level is of historical significance only; although it was used on some early machines (for example, the Thinking Machines CM-2), as of 2014 it is not used by any commercially available system.

  • RAID 3 consists of byte-level striping with dedicated parity. All disk spindle rotation is synchronized and data is striped such that each sequential byte is on a different drive. Parity is calculated across corresponding bytes and stored on a dedicated parity drive. Although implementations exist, RAID 3 is not commonly used in practice.

  • RAID 4 consists of block-level striping with dedicated parity. This level was previously used by NetApp, but has now been largely replaced by a proprietary implementation of RAID 4 with two parity disks, called RAID-DP. The main advantage of RAID 4 over RAID 2 and 3 is I/O parallelism: in RAID 2 and 3, a single read I/O operation requires reading the whole group of data drives, while in RAID 4 one I/O read operation does not have to spread across all data drives. As a result, more I/O operations can be executed in parallel, improving the performance of small transfers.

  • RAID 5 consists of block-level striping with distributed parity. Unlike RAID 4, parity information is distributed among the drives, requiring all drives but one to be present to operate. Upon failure of a single drive, subsequent reads can be calculated from the distributed parity such that no data is lost. RAID 5 requires at least three disks. RAID 5 implementations are susceptible to system failures because of trends regarding array rebuild time and the chance of drive failure during rebuild (see "Increasing rebuild time and failure probability" section, below). Rebuilding an array requires reading all data from all disks, opening a chance for a second drive failure and the loss of the entire array. In August 2012, Dell posted an advisory against the use of RAID 5 in any configuration on Dell EqualLogic arrays and RAID 50 with "Class 2 7200 RPM drives of 1 TB and higher capacity" for business-critical data.

  • RAID 6 consists of block-level striping with double distributed parity. Double parity provides fault tolerance up to two failed drives. This makes larger RAID groups more practical, especially for high-availability systems, as large-capacity drives take longer to restore. RAID 6 requires a minimum of four disks. As with RAID 5, a single drive failure results in reduced performance of the entire array until the failed drive has been replaced. With a RAID 6 array, using drives from multiple sources and manufacturers, it is possible to mitigate most of the problems associated with RAID 5. The larger the drive capacities and the larger the array size, the more important it becomes to choose RAID 6 instead of RAID 5. RAID 10 also minimizes these problems.

There are other levels, called 'nested levels', like RAID 0+1, RAID 1+0, and JBOD RAID N+N. You can find more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID.

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!]: 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out ?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."    — Charles Babbage.

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77 (edited by Green Gables Fan 2017-11-05 19:42:52)

@Rory, I was actually thinking about writing a post on the OT room, and or write a blog post about it because it's true. Blind people, who first start out with technology given to them by their school districts, spend time experimenting with them until they are deeply involved with what they've got. I might also talk about how careers, at least in the United States, are limited to technology for blind individuals because they are easy to accommodate. But back on topic, I heard from people who say that it seems unfair that they put in a lot of work to erect their new shelters, and then to have people destroy them when not everyone can defend for oneself. As Imaginatrix had said, I do not relish in player Killing, even though some would argue by saying that player killing is a form of survival. Some of that, including the annual or semi-annual gladiatorial events remind me of the Hunger Game Series.
Also, at Ethin, how would I go about setting up a RAID? Do I need specific types of hard drives? I currently have 1 Seagate AgentGoFlex Drive, and I plan to get another one. They will both be 1 TB in size. One was accidentally formatted as HFS, so I have to use Paragon's HFS+ to access it.

Ulysses
AKA Green_Gables_fan and HeavenlyHarmony
My new, self-hosted version of WordPress!

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@rory
why are all blind people good at computing. Because who today uses brail typewriter, who uses a white cane, who uses even a guide dog. See, computers are advancing and they offer more accessibility features then other things in this world, I think that it's the main reason. And owe I think that Sam Is type of guy who spends over 90% time of his life on the computer.

Aleksandar
My search criteria on audiogames will never be the age of the developer, what ever someone else may say.
If you wish to contact me, please do it by email or any other way in my profile.
And, give me a thumbs up, that keep me motivated to do stuf, even if I cant do any stuf.

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yeah, but sighted people use computers too, there starting to replace pens and paper. But most sighted people don't spend as much time as blind people do on their computers, when they very easily could. This is an estimate, but I'd say 5 out of 5 blind people are extrordinary on a computer where as only 2 out of 5 sighted people are at that same level. Just seems weird to me.
Getting back on topic, stw is quite like the hunger games, I sometimes turn pk on just to make things interesting. I always try to imagine being my character, so one time I fled into the ocean with a boat to escape the forest and could hear static over the radio (static being jiberish) and my name. It added some fear to the game as I had to run for my life. I wouldn't want that all the time though, because when the game was like that before the pk was an optional thing the game was just a killing fest and rather hard to play.

I am the blind jedi, I use the force to see. I am the only blind jedi.

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@Rory, what's your STW user name? I do agree that people have stopped using ancient technology a long time ago, but I somehow sort of miss it. It seemed rather simple back then, whereas now you have endless possibilities that could easily overwhelm you if you are not experienced. I wouldn't have been able to launch my new WordPress site if it hadn't been for a kindly volunteer who knew what it was like to not have the support to get started.

Ulysses
AKA Green_Gables_fan and HeavenlyHarmony
My new, self-hosted version of WordPress!

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Its BlindJedi, haven't played in ages though, hopefully its not deleted again.

I am the blind jedi, I use the force to see. I am the only blind jedi.

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@rory
There's actually a quite reasonable explanation, or at least so I've convinced myself. As a person with a visual impairment, many of the ways we interact with your every-day environment are different. Very commonly, we're not treated the same. The moment you get behind a computer, this can change. Hell, I've talked to many people who never had the slightest idea I couldn't see. Why then, are many blind people good at using computers? Because its an environment where we can focus on our talents and being people instead of the fact our eyes don't work like everyone elses.
I'm not saying its healthy to spend your entire life on a computer and never get out of the house, statistics can back that up.

Their is absolutely no correlation, at least in my case and I'm pretty sure in Sams, with safety concerns or various other reasons. And I haven't found anything to point me to the conclusion people who do this have no life outside. Many parents choose to allow this not because they're not aware, but because they understand the above.

You can follow me on twitter @cartertemm

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i disagree. There's no reason to do what you do just like everybody else inthe outside world, lets say, can't think of a better term for that. Using a computer as a blind person means that you still have to addapt that computer to your needs and install jaws or NVDA or turn voiceover on on a mac. The same goes for sports. When I ski, I have a guide in front of me directing me. I do it exactly the same as a sighted person would otherwise, the same way I use a computer. Hell, sometimes my friends will tell me theyforget i'm blind because the way I do things isn't actually too different and can easily be overlooked. My point is that you don't need a computer to feel normal so to speak.

I am the blind jedi, I use the force to see. I am the only blind jedi.

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Let me ask you this then. How apparent is it that I'm using a screen reader, other than the fact this is being posted to an audiogame discussion forum? Slight adaptation is inevitable. I don't recall stating there's a reason you shouldn't, "do what you do in the outside world." Merely that normally we're not treated the same way. Granted I'm sure many of us have those people who forget this fact, and personal experience plays a big role. Also being in high-school can't help any.

When your skiing, others can clearly see you require assistance. Is this a reason not to do it? Hell no! However, people might be hesitant to get engaged in a conversation or get over how, amazing you are because of the things your doing. Of course, this reaction is totally normal and expected, and some want that element out of the picture.
When on a forum, I can participate in a conversation about how in python, using from module import * isn't a good idea. What are the chances Joe, who's just casually reading, is gonna wonder if I'm using a screen reader?

You can follow me on twitter @cartertemm

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The point f the topic was STW, so go back to the topic and please quit the shit about computers. Discuss it privately if it is necessary so that people can reach to the links of the helpful posts and only.

Life is one so live it

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Musicfan wrote:

The point f the topic was STW, so go back to the topic and please quit the shit about computers. Discuss it privately if it is necessary so that people can reach to the links of the helpful posts and only.

Lol, nice post, fare point also.

I am the blind jedi, I use the force to see. I am the only blind jedi.

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We should start a new thread about computers, then. Then you can post what you want as long as it is not a direct insult to anyone.
I was just going to add that in the US, blindness is the number 1 most feared disability out of all the other disabilities, according to a few news articles I read. And yet, I heard a blind guy say that sighted people have their own disabilities--they're too light-dependent. They need light to function.
But also going back to STW, ever noticed the increase in restrictions over time? First, you collect items quickly with space bar, like wood, grass, clay, etc. Now you have to wait one second before you can draw it again. Then they probably added a few more, but the next one I remember is that your energy cannot go above three thousand or else you'll suffer negative consequences. Next, you can't place shelters on trees any more and enjoy cutting down the tree and have the people fall off when they exit the shelter. I think there was a big discussion about how there were rumours that required everyone to have a paid account, like Swamp, which really pissed some people off. The thing is, if you are going to develop games, shouldn't you be active on forums and stuff and ask for suggestions based on what players want, or are you going to implement the changes without getting any of their opinion and risk losing a lot of people because of it?

Ulysses
AKA Green_Gables_fan and HeavenlyHarmony
My new, self-hosted version of WordPress!

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I'm still personally annoyed by the inflation change. I can understand the energy one, but not the other two. And I think if you've paid for the full game, you should get more perks than an endless inventory and the possibility to go over 1k health or energy. I'm still glad I did it when I did, because of the new shelter that takes a godforsaken age and a thousand of too many things to build, but still, it would be nice if we had some more benefits to buying the game. Like discounts at vending machines/when buying things with stw points. If you're gonna add inflation, surely paying for your game would counterbalance that. And gifts! If paid accounts could pick up even twice as many gifts as unpaid accounts, wouldn't that encourage someone to shell out the $16 usd?

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problem, though, is that this inflation is because of the paid accounts. if they get a price deflation, then there's no point increasing prices, and at the end of the day, poor nubies will drink the juice of that,.

some things can never be forgotten, some things can never be forgiven, some damage can never be undone.

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I suggested that people who have a shitload of coins should use a coin to STW point converter, similar to how a change machine would work. If you run out of quests, how else would you get STW points? If we could get more people to use their coins and then have them use their new STW points, perhaps the number of coins would decrease a tad.

Ulysses
AKA Green_Gables_fan and HeavenlyHarmony
My new, self-hosted version of WordPress!

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But the only way you get coins other than letting yourself die and lose everything is by using stw points! Why can't spending the coins get rid of them? Can we break into wherever the vending machines store the coins if they keep them in the game somehow?

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