1

hi guys
can sum 1 give me link of q9 action game, because i cant fine any link to download it
an thanks

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2

Can someone delete one of these similar topiks please?
Same title and much more!

I am your friend, your spam bot reporter, I am what ever do you wan a be to you, but if it is not good, I will not be!
And please, give me a tumbsup, it makes me happy to see one.
Thanks.
Angel Productions, the producer of nothing :)

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3

Somebody could provide the games files, however, unless you purchased the game from Blast Bay Studios, it would only be a demo.

Phillip Benfall (I hope I spelled that right) sold the rights to the game to Hartgen Consultancy who made it a part of their Leasey product's games module. So now, to get the full Q9 games you have to have a legally licensed copy of JAWS plus a legally licensed copy of Leasey.

Sorry.

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4

Yeah, leasey, an inclusive platform of audio games. big_smile

It's so sad these games like q9 are available ontly there.

love is my destiny.
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5

@oussamabengatrane do you have a registration code? If you do, I will send you the game installer, it's still floating around the internet, so I don't see why I can't send it. lol

"I've learned that this life's not just a game, just a line, between the pleasures and the pain." - Aaron Lewis

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6 (edited by Orko 2017-08-15 21:12:42)

staindaddict is right, if you don't have a registration code purchased from Blast Bay Studios when they were selling it all you'll get from the installer is a demo and there's no harm giving you that, so here it is.

https://www.sendspace.com/file/sqfue9

Enjoy!

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7

i think I might've heard tentative plans to make the games center stand-alone after the major update to Leasey, but not much else since then, unfortunately.

I'm the only adventure at c: master hahahaha I have unlocked just about everything!

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8

What Is leasy?
I do not know much about it!

I am your friend, your spam bot reporter, I am what ever do you wan a be to you, but if it is not good, I will not be!
And please, give me a tumbsup, it makes me happy to see one.
Thanks.
Angel Productions, the producer of nothing :)

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9

That's my only problem with Phillip and Blastbay. He makes some great games. That's for sure. However, Instead of making Q9 freeware (so that everyone can enjoy it), he says "Oh, I know what I'll do. I'll just give Hartjen Consultancy the right to make my game even more expensive!"

And I will bring the blind by a way that they knew not; I will lead them in paths that they have not known: I will make darkness light before them, and crooked things straight. These things will I do unto them, and not forsake them.
Isaiah 42:16

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10 (edited by Orko 2017-08-11 15:48:04)

Leasey is a set of scripts for JAWS that add a bunch of features and tools to JAWS as well as providing a controlled environment for computer beginners to help them learn to use their computers. As the beginner advances, the controlled environment can be switched off when it is no longer needed, yet all the added features and tools remain.

I made the mistake of buying it, because for what it is, it's way over priced.

I uninstalled it long ago and just use JAWS without it.

AS far as the rumor of making the games module a stand alone product, I haven't heard that and seriously doubt that will ever happen.

Even if it was made a stand alone product, I doubt there would be many buyers. One reason would be that most of what's in it is freely available elsewhere, for example it has all of the Spoonbill Blind Gamers games, the RS games client, and Park Boss.

The games that are exclusive, not available anywhere else, most are written in BGT so there's the BGT & JAWS keyboard hooking conflict, and you can't get around that problem by using another screen reader like NVDA because the games are written using the JAWS API instead of the standard accessibility API that works with any screen reader, so if you are unlucky enough to be bitten by the keyboard hooking conflict most of the exclusive games are unusable. The only exclusive game that would be at all usable would be Q9 and that's because it was an outside acquisition rather than something written specifically for Hartgen.

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11

dont buy this game. i've completed it and it's waisting time

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12

What added features of Leasey are those, then? I was just wondering if it was worth it myself--guess you've answered that question for me. I'll check out the product pages nonetheless.

Just myself, as usual.

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13

Oh it adds things like multiple clipboards, a global contacts directory, internet radio, and bookmarks that not only remember the page but a specific location on the page, and other stuff.

They're nice to have if you want them, I just think it's a bit over priced.

And except for Q9, the games module is almost pointless.

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14

I agree, I may have considered buying it, but now that it's over a thousand dollars, there's no way in hell that I'd buy it. I don't think Leacy nor Jaws are worth anywhere near the price that they're sold at, so I would probably just get the Division of Blind Services to buy me a copy. Unless you have a lot of money, I would strongly recommend you not waste your time with the product, and especially not for a game like q9.

You can follow me on twitter @brogar2000, and my Skype is garrett.brown2014. If you want to follow me on any of these things, please tell me you're from the forum, or else I won't follow you back. Also, it depends on who you are.

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15 (edited by jack 2017-08-10 14:20:27)

@Blindncool, it's not as easy as that. Philip was probably made an offer. Let's take into account that q9 is the first commercial game that was acquired by Hartgen. Philip probably had no idea was he would've gotten into, but probably thought just as much as it is a legitimate offer why turn it down? I suppose it would only make financial sense for him. Turns out it ended probably as he never intended it to, i e, q9 was tied into an expensive package. @Garret and all others detracting q9 as it were, you gotta remember, this was 2009, and the game was written in c++. It's not something that could've been cranked out like a bgt game could be. Coding in c++ is a pretty overwhelming task, which is the main reason he made bgt, to simplify things and make something that is designed with audiogames in mind, that takes care of all the low-level functions required for the average game (sound handling, keyboard input, text to speech, you name it.) So coding a game like q9 took a lot more time. As for whether it holds up to today's standards? Say what you will, but I say definitely yes. Sure, it's not Adventure at C:, but it certainly holds up to today's standards a lot more than some other titles do. Even so, I would never call it *wasting time* as AlirezaNosrati puts it.

I'm the only adventure at c: master hahahaha I have unlocked just about everything!

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16

And I beg to differ with shotgunshell with his comment that JAWS isn't worth the price. I have  and do not regret buying it. For me it has and still is worth every penny I paid for it.

Just because it's more than you can afford, doesn't make it not worth the asking price.

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17

I agree. Probably not one of Philip's smarter decisions. As for the game I definitely enjoyed it a great deal. Heck, I did a let's play of it on YouTube a while back LOL. I still have my registration (although remembering on which specific storage device I backed it up may take a while), so I'm spared the necessity of buying the overpriced scripts. I won't go so far as to say that JFW isn't worth the price, although after ten years of using Window-Eyes the switch back has been a little hard, more emotionally than anything else. But getting back on topic I love the atmosphere of the game not to mention the music.

Focus your powers and prepare for buttle.

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18 (edited by Orko 2017-08-11 01:10:40)

Oh yeah, I almost forgot. I also disagree that Q9 is a waste of time. Side scrollers aren't my favorite type of game mainly because I'm not very good at them, but that doesn't mean I haven't enjoyed all the hours I've spent playing Q9, even if I can't beat it on easy!

What I'd like to do now is figure out where the games registration data is stored so I can save it to a .reg file for future use. As it is now, to set it up I have to first install Leasey, then the games module, then run Q9. Then terminate the game with the task manager, then manually remove Leasey and the games module from my system, then finally run the Blast Bay Studio installer.

If I could capture the registration data, then I could skip all the non sense  with Leasey and the games module.

But, if I ever find it, don't ask me for a copy. I may not agree with what Phillip ultimately did with the game, but I will honor his decision by not distributing the registration codes.

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19

Jaws can be obtained much, much more cheaply if you can get certification. I'm not sure what the cost of applying is, but after that it's just a multiple-choice test, and you get a few tries to score 80% or higher. Certification cuts the cost down to 10% the normal price.

Some of my games
Keep up to date by following @Jeqofire on twitter!
Ear Ninja?

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20

Let me rephrase what I said. I don't think Q9 itself is a waste of time, but if you were to buy leacy just for that, plus a few extra games and a few extra features for Jaws, yes, I think it's a waste of time. As for buying Jaws, I have to point out that NVDA is free and has a lot more features to it if you install addons, which by the way are also free. If you're paying for Jaws, you're paying about $900 for a screen reader with fewer features, and 200 extra to get a few more features, plus a few games. Of course, this is just my opinion, and if people like Jaws, that's perfectly fine with me. I'd ask for other opinions, but I think that's better suited for another topic.

You can follow me on twitter @brogar2000, and my Skype is garrett.brown2014. If you want to follow me on any of these things, please tell me you're from the forum, or else I won't follow you back. Also, it depends on who you are.

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21

@shotgun shell

I'm not going to get into it with you over the merits of one screen reader over another, so this is my last word on it.

As Joe Steincamp of the Blind Bargains podcast said, "It does nobody any good to write disparaging remarks about other people's choices for a screen reader. Such remarks add nothing to the conversation and are more likely to start a useless flame war than anything else. If you can't not say disparaging remarks about other screen readers, perhaps it would be best for all concerned if you kept those remarks to yourself."

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22

Use whatever screen reader you want, I just don't see the point in having games that are only available for the Leasey platform. I feel like this could also start a flame war though, so this will also be my last post here and indeed might be the last time I look at this topic.

Sincerely,
Lucas.
Visit my website at: http://lucasspace.x10.mx

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23 (edited by jack 2017-08-11 05:53:03)

Yeah. I was gonna say this before it does start turn into a flame war, and this is just factual. All the major screenreaders are good. Jaws has its strength in supporting the obscure proprietary business interfaces that people go out of their way to make in-house Jaws scripts for, either because they haven't heard of nvda, refuse to work with anything open-sourced, or just are going along with it as Jaws is, by a large margin, still the international standard for access software. Jaws also is good in that it has several training materials, and even the reader itself holds your hand quite a bit if you allow it to. Nvda, on the other hand, is strongly suited for the advanced user as window-eyes was when it was around. It *can* be used by a beginning computer user willing to jump into the deep-end of learning various tasks, but for someone intimidated *a beginning computer user in general,* Jaws and Leasey would suit them and work very well for their purposes. Look, the thing with these screenreaders is that *some accessories* for them, such as Leasey, are marketed at a specific audience. Leasey for example, caters to computer beginners and somewhat advanced users. Nvda is for those who either are technologically advanced, programmers on the open source front, and people who are willing to go all in when learning how to use a computer. Does Jaws cost a lot? Yes. Taking into account they are a corporation who has a full-scale amount of employees to hire. But let's just say it's, more than the average customer can afford, but the definition of average may vary. The long and short of it is, while there will be a time, naturally, when proprietary screenreaders will have to go as open source accessibility becomes more prominent, all 3 screenreaders have an active target audience receiving them in the meantime. And if that audience consists of state agencies? Well, whatever satisfies Fs's wallet will suffice, I suppose. Lol! But Orco's absolutely right, being heavily opinionated about screenreaders and deficiencies really doesn't do much to help the situation. Indeed, FS doesn't really play by that standard as they have been seen trolling the hell out of Nv Access in short random comments here and there, but on the same side there are elitists in the Nvda community, not the main developers but active members, who will do the exact same thing. I think the time for playing sides and staying on them has to come to an end somehow, and anyone in the argument need s to see both sides of the coin. Indeed, there was an ad on the trade-list, talking to playing both sides, that I think would deserve ad of the year, because it proves my point. Someone would transfer and sell their Jaws18 license, with a twist. There wasn't a set price, but the Jaws 18 license would go to the bidder who made the largest contribution to NV Access, it had to be above $200. But the largest amount would get the Jaws 18 license. And that, is a great way to play both sides without getting too up-close and personal in the argument. A person that swears up and down by Fs and has a fair amount of cash could buy a license for Jaws while contributing to NV Access at the same time, making it a win-win for both sides. With that, rant over. This post almost definitely belongs in a new topic, but thought I'd post it here to settle any potential heated debates.

I'm the only adventure at c: master hahahaha I have unlocked just about everything!

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24

Wait wait, so even if, as I now suspect, I have a Q9 installer lying around on my old computer, I'd still have to run Leasy even though I have a registration code?

Focus your powers and prepare for buttle.

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25

@Brian

No, if you have a valid registration code for Q9 you don't need JAWS or Leasey. You can just run your installer, enter your registration code, and you're good to go!

@Jack

Well said. I don't mind discussing the strenggths and weaknesses of one screen reader over another, but draw the line when people get militant about it, making disparaging remarks about other screen readers and their users simply because it isn't their choice.

While I am a happy and satisfied JAWS user who believes that JAWS is worth every penny paid for it, I also have NVDA installed for those few times when JAWS just doesn't work, such as when playing games written in BGT that aren't self voiced.

I also agree that what happened to Q9 is a shame. locking it to a product that only works with a specific screen reader hurts everybody. But it isn't alone, There are four other games in the Leasey games module that aren't available anywhere else, the difference between them and Q9 is that they were specifically written for Hartgen and were never available as a stand alone product as Q9 was.

What I want to do now is find the Q9 registration code that the Leasey games module writes to where Q9 needs it so that I can remove having to install Leasey just to play the game. I did buy Leasey so I believe I'm entitled to that much.

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