2018-11-06 09:17:44 (edited by Dark 2018-11-06 10:27:00)

One site I frequent is Tor.com, a site about publishing, fantasy and sf.
Though of late there are rather too many articles of the "we all hate men" variety, I still occasionally have a poke around there just to see if there's something interesting, as well as check out on rereads etc.

James Davis Nickle is a hard sf writer and correspondent who often comments on  matters affecting real science and science fiction, such as the plausibility of fusion reactors or exploiting the solar system for mining.

His most recent article, which can be Found here however absolutely blew me away!

The jist is that an object called ‘Oumuamua1 has been berified as the first ever object of interstellar origin to be detected crossing the solar system. It is not  a comet or an asteroid because its shape and composition are different from either. it might be just a natural chance, or debris from an exploding planet or stellar matter, however there are orbital discrepancies which indicate it could well be moving artificially, if (from a galactic perspective), very slowly, indeed one theory is that its an artificially constructed solar light sale.

Is this our first encounter with something truly alien, or another example of leaping to conclusions. Well it'll be interesting to find out.

Personally, i am of the firm belief that with the universe being the size it is, to assume we are alone in the universe is pure hubris (especially with the myriad forms of life and number of extremely harsh environments things can live in on earth), , though equally with space being the size it actually is, whether we will encounter anything alien is anyone's guess.

I'd love confirmation of extra solar life, and I think it would do a hell of a lot of good for the over all spirit of generally egocentric negativity that seems to be the prevailing mood of the age if we did! find such a discovery.

That being said, I'm also aware of the problems of jumping to conclusions as well, after all its happened before.

Still, hopefully people will find this idea interesting, and see it as a nice source of speculation.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

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2018-11-06 14:01:33

Hi,
I have heard of this before. Unfortunately from what a lot of people are saying, it’s very likely to be just another strangely composed spacerock, all be it from another star.

Bar, bar, bar...
Bar is my name and to go bar is my aim...
Sometimes I'll go "Bad bar",
But in the end its always bar, ahem beer, ahem bar! beer bar!

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2018-11-06 14:34:07

It was an extraordinary event whatever it was. I feel strangely honoured to have been alive during this first witnessed visitor from another system. . It's interesting that it was originally given the name Rama after the Arthur C Clarke novel, which is one of my all-time favourites. I just wish they could have got their hands on it. It just came and went so fast, we'll always be left to speculate.

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2018-11-06 15:21:24

Interestingly enough Conner, the idea that it is an asteroid is negated by the fact of its shape and its rather eccentric orbit pattern, just as the idea that its a  comitt is less likely due to there being no gas tale or visible ice, indeed when I checked the wikipedia article it suggested that its probably metalic in surface area, though whether that means it is some sort of artificial construct, or whether that means its just a bit of an exploded planet is not certain.

"Flacus, I agree, a shame it wasn't called Rama that would've been cool.
About finding out though, apparently there have been a couple of proposed space missions. Even if they get the funding to get going, it'll take a few years to actually reach the thing and see what it is, but it'd be awesome if they did.

With our dreaming and singing, Ceaseless and sorrowless we! The glory about us clinging Of the glorious futures we see,
Our souls with high music ringing; O men! It must ever be
That we dwell in our dreaming and singing, A little apart from ye. (Arthur O'Shaughnessy 1873.)

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2018-11-06 16:25:16

Wow, I had no idea they could even catch up with the thing. If any space mission is worth investing in that surely must qualify highly.

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2018-11-06 18:47:06

Hi,
Very thought-provoking reading, thanks for sharing Dark!

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